Dylan, Elvis - Charlottesville, VA , Sept. 27 '07

Pretty self-explanatory
johnfoyle
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Dylan, Elvis - Charlottesville, VA , Sept. 27 '07

Postby johnfoyle » Sat Sep 22, 2007 1:31 pm

Anyone going?

johnfoyle
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Postby johnfoyle » Thu Sep 27, 2007 1:00 am


johnfoyle
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Postby johnfoyle » Fri Sep 28, 2007 12:50 am

http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/entertain ... -0254.html

Costello, Dylan prove an engaging pairing

After Brit's solo set, Dylan mixes it up on keyboard and guitar

Friday, Sep 28, 2007

By MELISSA RUGGIERI
TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER

Once a year, concert industry magazine Pollstar awards the most creative tour package of the season.

The 2007 winner can already be named.

As striking a pairing in reality as on paper, Bob Dylan and Elvis Costello brought their legacy, cynicism and airtight songbook to John Paul Jones Arena last night.

Though Costello, chipper and grinning in a black suit and trademark black specs, referred to himself and fledgling soulster Amos Lee as Dylan's opening acts, Costello should never be relegated to secondary status.

After giving the nearly sold-out crowd of about 6,500 a hearty "How are ya?", he burst into "Either Side of the Same Town" and "Veronica," attacking his acoustic guitar with electrifying vigor. Even in acoustic form -- Costello performed his hour-long set solo -- and missing its glossy sheen, the song still bopped infectiously. What else can you expect from a pop tune partially constructed by Paul McCartney?

The British Costello cheerfully accepted his many ovations with the curl of a smile that suggested he basked in the adoration. But, even when sharing a witty yarn about his two American-born sons and their chances of becoming president over Arnold Schwarzenegger, it was evident that Costello had a deeper message to convey.

A biting "kind of campaign song" written with T-Bone Burnett contained the chorus "It's not very far from sulfur to sugar cane," and Costello altered the lyrics to the pensive ballad "Scarlet Tide" to include "Admit you lied and bring the boys back home" -- a line greeted with impassioned cheers from the audience.

The crowd spanning many ages retained its enthusiasm when Dylan and his five-piece band, dressed in identical sidewalk-gray suits and black fedoras, crept on stage.

Dylan, clad in a black suit with a flat-brimmed cowboy hat hovering over his craggy face, plowed into his fusion of blues, country and rock, his guttural rasp of a voice swallowing every word.

But this Charlottesville stop afforded a setlist more familiar than other dates on this joint tour that began last weekend in Georgia.

On "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right," Dylan injected eloquent pauses between the syllables, burning up the fret board of his guitar while lead guitarist Denny Freeman did the same, both seemingly lost in their own musical world.

While he spent some of his 100-minute set caressing the guitar, Dylan appeared most comfortable behind the keyboard, knees bent and shoulders hunched over the keys.

"Tangled Up in Blue" was Dylanized with an unrecognizable cadence, but those groovy keyboards were unmistakable, especially as he played with his right hand, the left one busy with the harmonica at his mouth.

At times, especially during "Watching the River Flow" and "Workingman's Blues," Dylan's voice was more akin to hacking up phlegm than singing. But isn't that part of the reason people revere him so much?

Though pockets of the show trudged with similar-sounding chord progressions, when Dylan and his crew blazed through "Highway 61 Revisited," they sounded like the tightest bar band this side of the Mississippi.

While those seated on the floor stood and clapped along for much of the show -- especially set-closer "All Along the Watchtower" -- many in the side levels remained seated. They would nod politely to the beat and try to decipher a single word, figuring at least they can tell their friends today that they saw the legendary Dylan live.

Contact Melissa Ruggieri at (804) 649-6120 or mruggieri@timesdispatch.com.

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And No Coffee Table
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Postby And No Coffee Table » Fri Sep 28, 2007 1:11 am

johnfoyle wrote:A biting "kind of campaign song" written with T-Bone Burnett contained the chorus "It's not very far from sulfur to sugar cane,"


I know this is the song they wrote for Sean Penn to sing in "All The King's Men"... But does anyone know if it actually appears in the movie?

johnfoyle
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Postby johnfoyle » Fri Sep 28, 2007 12:53 pm

But does anyone know if it actually appears in the movie?


Martin has seen Steve Zaillian's remake of "All the King's Men " and tells me Sulfur to Sugar Cane doesn't feature in it. This movie had such a tortuous release history that it seems likely the producers went for broke (unsuccessfully) and spent the music budget on a James Horner score.

Getting back to last night's show , this Dylan fan has an amusing account -

http://my.execpc.com/~billp61/092707r.html

(extract)

Elvis Costello took the stage rather suddenly with four different acoustic
guitars and immediately launched into "(The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red
Shoes". I wasn't quite dancing though his set, but he did bring back fond
memories and who knew he was so funny? His other hits were "Veronica",
'Allison" and "What's So Funny About Peace, Love and Understanding?"

I didn't really recognize the other songs in his 45 minute set, but he
played this one song where he engaged in a call and response type
sing-a-long and whenever he went 'Wake up!' the audience would respond
with the same. At one point he suddenly started playing part of a song by
John Lennon and when he lurched away from the microphone, I jumped up and
sang out as loud as I could "I don't want to be a soldier mama, I don't
want to die!', but apparently I was the only one among the 20,000
attendees who knew that lyric well enough to scream it out and he nodded
slightly, laughed and went on with the song. I felt 'Special'.

LapisLee
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Postby LapisLee » Fri Sep 28, 2007 4:29 pm

johnfoyle wrote:
But does anyone know if it actually appears in the movie?


Martin has seen Steve Zaillian's remake of "All the King's Men " and tells me Sulfur to Sugar Cane doesn't feature in it. This movie had such a tortuous release history that it seems likely the producers went for broke (unsuccessfully) and spent the music budget on a James Horner score.

Getting back to last night's show , this Dylan fan has an amusing account -

http://my.execpc.com/~billp61/092707r.html

(extract)

Elvis Costello took the stage rather suddenly with four different acoustic
guitars and immediately launched into "(The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red
Shoes". I wasn't quite dancing though his set, but he did bring back fond
memories and who knew he was so funny? His other hits were "Veronica",
'Allison" and "What's So Funny About Peace, Love and Understanding?"

I didn't really recognize the other songs in his 45 minute set, but he
played this one song where he engaged in a call and response type
sing-a-long and whenever he went 'Wake up!' the audience would respond
with the same. At one point he suddenly started playing part of a song by
John Lennon and when he lurched away from the microphone, I jumped up and
sang out as loud as I could "I don't want to be a soldier mama, I don't
want to die!', but apparently I was the only one among the 20,000
attendees who knew that lyric well enough to scream it out and he nodded
slightly, laughed and went on with the song. I felt 'Special'.

Yeah, that was me! Why didn't the rest of you sing along? :evil:
Also, who has the full set list for Costello?

johnfoyle
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Postby johnfoyle » Fri Sep 28, 2007 4:56 pm

http://www.styleweekly.com/article.asp?idarticle=15335

The Virginian-Pilot

ARTS & CULTURE

Sept. 28, 2007

Dylan and Costello Push for the 22nd Century

Concert Review

by Olivia Beatty

Say what you will about Bob Dylan - at 66, the man still knows how to rock. Dylan is a living legend, one of the few socially conscious rock troubadours to make it out of the ’60s alive.

And thank goodness he did. He and his five-piece band proved they still have what it takes get an arena of thousands on their feet screaming. Dylan filled Charlottesville’s John Paul Jones Arena Thursday with his blues-infused, country-tinged, good old-fashioned rock ’n’ roll.

In a wide-brimmed flat cowboy hat, hips swinging, Dylan proved his talent on guitar, keyboard and harmonica. It’s impressive that the man has made a career with a voice that sounds like he’s got a mouthful of cotton balls, but those nasally vocals are what make his voice unmistakable.

The show was a best-of bonanza, combining ’60s classics, tracks off his 2006 album, “Modern Times,â€

bronxapostle
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Postby bronxapostle » Fri Sep 28, 2007 6:19 pm

where are the setlists? unbelievably, we are ALL staying away! i wonder why. would it be different if they were pairing up on 2-3 DIFFERENT songs each night???????????????

DavidW
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Postby DavidW » Fri Sep 28, 2007 9:40 pm

Here is the set list that I remember. Let me know if I missed any.

(The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes
Either Side of the Same Town
Veronica
River In Reverse/I Don't Wanna Be A Soldier
Bedlam
Jackie Wilson Said
Radio Sweetheart
Scarlet Tide
Sulfur to Sugar Cane
In Another Room
Alison
(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding?

During "River In Reverse", he quoted the John Lennon song - "I don't wanna be a soldier, Mama. I don't wanna die".

The songs on my list are not in the order he performed them. I did not take notes during the concert.

vigilantmeerkat
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Postby vigilantmeerkat » Fri Sep 28, 2007 11:36 pm

I went to the Ch'ville concert primarily to hear Dylan, but was looking forward to hearing Elvis too. I'm not an expert on Elvis's music--but I do know some of his more popular songs quite well. The reporter from the Times-Dispatch is wrong. He definitely opened with "The Angels Wanna Wear My Red Shoes."

I was really impressed with his performance. It takes great talent to stand onstage with nothing but an acoustic guitar and hold an audience's attention the way he did.

A couple of other observations I haven't seen mentioned here--

He was wearing a black shirt and trousers and a great pair of silver boots that looked as if they were paved with tiny rhinestones from top to toe. The boots sparkled like crazy under the spotlight. I imagine they could see those boots up in the rafter seats!

Early on, between songs, he made some sort of comment about Dick Cheney that I couldn't make out. There was a definite political flavor to his performance--maybe because Ch'ville is home to the University of VA, Thomas Jefferson's university.

Also, he said that Arnold Schwarzenegger has really "scary teeth" when he smiles, and that when he met him he pointed out that Arnold could never be President, but that his sons (those born in America anyway) could be.

He seemed in a really cheerful mood and gestured several times for the audience to get on its feet. He joked about his "brother" T-Bone. He changed guitars 4 times (all were amped acoustics) during the course of his performance. There was a sign over by the guitars standing on the side of the stage that said "Beware of Dog," but there was so much equipment on stage for the 3 various acts I'm not sure if that sign referred specifically to Elvis's guitars.

When he sang "Alison," a song I'm well-familiar with, he added in an extra verse--don't know if he was ad-libbing or if he'd written the lines out in advance. Parts of it were performed almost a capella and he was in beautiful voice. Also, the sound in the arena was nearly perfect, at least where I was sitting.

After his final song "WSFAPLAU" he said, "Thankyou! Thanks for listening to me," before he left the stage.

All in all, he seemed an extremely affable person and a highly professional performer. Everyone I spoke to afterwards was quite impressed and said that they'd go see him again. I certainly would.

And Dylan was most definitely "on" last night. He was enunciating on most all of the songs and he looked as if he wanted to dance all night--he couldn't keep his legs or feet still. And the encore, "All Along the Watchtower" had all the kids, old and young, on their feet dancing and singing along. From the opening notes and throughout the song, it sounded as if Denny Freeman was covering Hendrix's version of the song--it was definitely a "hard rockified" homage. . .except it had the benefit of the Poet himself's sly phrasing!

What a great show! It ranks up there with the best concerts I've ever attended!

LapisLee
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Postby LapisLee » Fri Sep 28, 2007 11:42 pm

I may as well post my updated review of the concert here since the Dylan site kept my rough draft that I wrote right after the concert, still somewhat intoxicated. I hope no one minds if it's Dylan-heavy.

I just got back from seeing Elvis Costello and Bob Dylan in concert at the John Paul Jones Arena in Charlottesville, VA so this review might sound bizarre and incoherent, but I know some of you like that!

The warm-up band was Amos Lee and they played a 30-minute set with about 6-8 songs including a nice rocker 'Raised By Wolves' and ended with Sam Cooke's 'A Change Is Gonna’ Come'. I was not familiar with this band, but the lead singer is very charismatic and belts out the songs in a style similar to Ben Harper, very sensitive and diverse with excellent acoustic guitar technique

Elvis Costello took the stage rather suddenly with four different acoustic guitars and immediately launched into ‘(The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes’. I wasn't quite dancing though his set, but he did bring back fond memories and who knew he was so funny? At the introduction to one song he said that he was thinking about Christmas time and that the following song was about a nativity scene in the Middle East, but instead of gold, frankincense and myrrh, the three wise men brought gold, frankincense and Cheney. “Cheney is a lot like myrrh, only bitter.â€

sweetest punch
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Postby sweetest punch » Sat Sep 29, 2007 2:17 am

Setlist from wiki:

song order may not be correct
01. (The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes
02. Either Side Of The Same Town
03. Veronica
04. The River In Reverse - including I Don't Want To Be A Soldier
05. Bedlam
06. Radio Sweetheart / Jackie Wilson Said
07. The Scarlet Tide
08. From Sulfur To Sugar Cane
09. In Another Room
10. Alison
11. (What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding?
Since you put me down, it seems i've been very gloomy. You may laugh but pretty girls look right through me.

DavidW
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Postby DavidW » Sat Sep 29, 2007 9:17 am

The set list from Wiki is in the same order as the one I posted, except I had "Jackie Wilson" before "Radio Sweetheart". Yes, I think he did segue into Jackie from Radio Sweetheart. I thought mine was close. So the Wiki entry probably has the correct sequence, unless it was based on my post above with that one correction. It might still be correct even if it is based on mine.

Does anyone here have the Amos Lee set list? I'm not familiar with his music. The Sam Cooke cover is the only song I recognized.

vigilantmeerkat
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Postby vigilantmeerkat » Sat Sep 29, 2007 3:41 pm

We now welcome Bob Dylan, the Progenitor of Rock of Roll!


It was, "We now welcome Bob Dylan, Poet Laureate of Rock and Roll."

It was difficult to hear most of the introduction after that because people were cheering so loud, but I'm certain about the poet part. Also, there was another line about him having found Jesus.

DavidW
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Postby DavidW » Sat Sep 29, 2007 5:16 pm

[quote="LapisLee"]
At the introduction to one song he said that he was thinking about Christmas time and that the following song was about a nativity scene in the Middle East, but instead of gold, frankincense and myrrh, the three wise men brought gold, frankincense and Cheney. “Cheney is a lot like myrrh, only bitter.â€

johnfoyle
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Postby johnfoyle » Mon Oct 01, 2007 7:08 am

http://timtimberlake.blogspot.com/2007/ ... -bill.html

Posted by Tim Timberlake

(extract)


It may reveal some lack of depth on my part, but for my music money, the goods came early in the "opening" performances by r&b sensation Amos Lee and the charmingly unplugged Elvis Costello. First Amos Lee...we'd been told by a friend's daughter that he was worth the price of admission alone and she was right. Amazing voice, great material and one of the tightest bands you could ever hope to hear. His keyboard guy Michael Bellar had his rig sounding like a big, fat Hammond B-3 with Leslie and he just nailed it. Amos closed with an inspired rendering of Sam Cooke's anthemic "A Change Gonna Come," and it brought the house down.

After a brief intermission, Costello, bristling with energy and charisma, let forth with a non-stop, all-too-short set of his thought-provoking, well-crafted songs including "Alison," and "(The Angels Want To Wear My) Red Shoes." Armed only with his vintage Gibson dreadnought, Elvis revealed something I discovered during his well-received performance at MerleFest earlier this year...this guy can sing. With pitch and power. A fitting vehicle for his potent lyrics. The only disappointment was when he mentioned that his singing wife and their new twin boys were hangin' backstage, not saying she was none other than jazz stylist Diana Krall. Having her join him for just one number would have been a treat. Has anyone seen them perform together?
So the new home of the Hoos doubles well as a venue for music...the sound was terrific.

johnfoyle
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Postby johnfoyle » Mon Oct 01, 2007 12:06 pm

http://media.www.commonwealthtimes.com/ ... 3094.shtml

Concert Review
Aging Rockers prove surprisingly energetic

By: OLIVIA BEATTY- Spectrum Editor

Posted: 10/1/07

Say what you will about Bob Dylan - at 66, the man still knows how to rock. Dylan is a musical icon, a living legend. He's one of the few socially conscious folk-rock troubadours to survive the '60s.

And we all should be very thankful he did. Dylan filled Charlottesville's John Paul Jones Arena Thursday with his blues- and country-infused brand of classic rock 'n' roll.

Dylan and his five-piece band showed they still have what it takes to get an arena of thousands on their feet screaming. While most of that crowd was in the 40-and-up age group, there were also plenty of college kids and 20-somethings to be found.

Wearing a wide-brimmed, flat cowboy hat and slick black suit, his hips swinging and legs bouncing, Dylan displayed his talent on guitar, keyboard and harmonica. His band completed the sound with superbly performed acoustic and electric guitars, drums, bass guitar, upright bass, pedal steel guitar and keyboards.

It's really quite impressive that Dylan has made a career out of singing as if he's got a mouthful of cotton balls, but those nasally vocals are what make his voice unmistakable. Mumbly and at times indiscernible lyrics have always been a part of his charm.

The show was a veritable best-of bonanza, combining Dylan's '60s classics, tracks off his 2006 album, "Modern Times," and many notable bits and pieces in between.

This mix could be attributed to the October release of "Dylan," yet another greatest-hits album, or maybe it was because he has a solid, nearly four-decades-long songbook to pick from.

A particularly energetic performance of the 1965 hit "Highway 61 Revisited" really got the audience charged.

In "Spirit on the Water" from his "Modern Times" album, he jokes about his age: "You think I'm over the hill.

You think I'm past my prime. Let me see what you got. We can have a whoppin' good time."

Dylan made the audience practically beg him to come back onstage for an encore. I guess when you're Bob Dylan you can make them wait an extra few minutes, just to be sure they make enough noise to warrant the effort of an extra two songs.

And what an encore it was. Dylan and his band played the up-tempo, hard-rocking "Thunder on the Mountain" from "Modern Times" and the pièce de résistance - his frequently covered 1967 guitar-driven masterpiece "All Along the Watchtower."

Opening for Dylan was fabulous post-new-wave rocker Elvis Costello, a headline-worthy act in his own right. He played an engaging and impressively energetic solo-acoustic set. Without any back-up musicians,

Costello was able to keep the audience attentive and entertained. His set included many of his classic hits "Alison," "Veronica,"(The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes," "Radio Sweetheart" and "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding."

Wearing his signature thick-rimmed black glasses, Costello's British wit proved just as charming between tunes as it was during them.

Nearing the role of musical storyteller, he strummed his guitar for a few seconds, then told part of a story, strummed some more, told more story - until the story was told and the song began. He told tales of spotting
California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in a restaurant and recounted the genesis of his politically charged newer songs.

Costello and Dylan made for a solid tour pairing, with the former's charm and short, poppy songs complementing the latter's straight-to-business rocking jam sessions.


Both musicians might be from another era, but they proved their abilities to create great new music and perform it with as much energy as musicians one-third their age. A good song is timeless, and hearing so many performed live by the original artist was priceless.


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