Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April 5th

Pretty self-explanatory
johnfoyle
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Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April 5th

Postby johnfoyle » Tue Nov 06, 2007 1:55 am

From listserv -

here's an mp3 of the new song with Rosanne Cash,
from Chicago 2007-10-28 -

http://www.mediafire.com/?8xb1dwdt5ym

(look for the "Click here to start download..")
Last edited by johnfoyle on Mon Feb 02, 2009 1:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

charliestumpy
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'New song With Rose' ...

Postby charliestumpy » Tue Nov 06, 2007 3:13 am

Thankyou again for enlightening/sharing.

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Postby johnfoyle » Tue Nov 06, 2007 1:30 pm

From listserv-

Positive thoughts for Roseanne Cash

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071106/ap_ ... sanne_cash

She's undergoing brain surgery for a rare condition.

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Postby Mikeh » Tue Nov 06, 2007 2:06 pm

Anyone got recording of the show EC did with Roseanne Cash earlier this year? It was on the theme of numbers and all songs had a number in the title!

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Re: mp3 - new song with Rosanne Cash

Postby johnfoyle » Mon Apr 07, 2008 4:18 pm

Rosanne is writing about her recovery ; it also indicates that the co-composition with Elvis dates from early '07.

http://measureformeasure.blogs.nytimes. ... index.html

New York Times
April 5, 2008

Well, Actually, It Is Brain Surgery


By Rosanne Cash

I haven’t written a song in about a year.


All of 2007 was a blur of pain, culminating in brain surgery last November. The surgery went fine, the recovery has been brutal, but I think I’m starting to get better, because just recently I’ve gotten excited about writing songs again.

I didn’t get there by a happy epiphany, but by pain of another sort. My friend and great songwriting mentor, John Stewart (”Daydream Believer,” “Gold,” “California Bloodlines”), died unexpectedly in January. When I heard the news, I pulled out a file I had saved with all the letters and drawings and faxes he had sent me over the years; I noticed that the dual themes of Love and Madness kept reappearing in his notes.

He used to say to me, upon hearing a new song of mine that he thought might be too perfect or careful or contrived, either lyrically or structurally, “But where’s the madness, Rose?” His belief in songs, and his sense of liberation and expansion when he approached writing, was deeply inspiring. John showed me that songs were the expression of the essential language that all other languages hinged upon. When I first began to know him, I felt that I had been speaking with a vocabulary of 200 words, and in a few months he taught me 10,000 more.

In our 20-year friendship, John and I only wrote one song together: “Dance With the Tiger,” which I recorded on my album “Interiors” in 1990. It was the only time in my history of songwriting collaboration, before or since, that anyone ever asked me to write the music to complete lyrics. He sent me the lyrics by fax, and I read them and then put them aside for a few weeks. Periodically, I got the page out and read them over, but I was spooked by the idea of writing music for John. I felt completely inadequate, not only because of my deep admiration for him but because I had a bit of a rep as a golden-girl lyricist. Who would think of asking me to write just a melody?

John did, and eventually I wrote the music to his lyrics and it gave me more confidence than writing a sheaf of lyrics. That was a watershed song for me. There have been others — when the level of my attention has increased, when I have broken free of chord-progression ruts, when a burst of inspiration propelled me an inch or two forward in my own evolution — but “Dance With the Tiger” was an important moment.

People always ask me, “What comes first, the music or the lyrics?” I don’t know why people are so fascinated with the answer to that question, and the question always makes me slightly nervous, as if I should have an expert opinion or a backlog of statistics on my own songwriting to give a definitive answer. I can’t.

Often, it’s true for me that the lyrics come first. I seldom find just melodies on the guitar that come out fully fleshed, and add the lyrics afterward. If I start on the piano, it often happens that the melody will come first, of a piece. The instrument has a lot to do with the order of inspiration. Sometimes. And sometimes the fragment of a conversation, the color of the sky, the image in a dream, has everything to do with where the song begins. My song “Seven Year Ache” began as a long poem, several pages of rambling, and I distilled it down into a lyric. The melody came last.

On vacation recently, there were some Christian fundamentalists at lunch at the next table and I felt the tension and constriction of their religious beliefs wafting off them like a perfume. That is my own projection, I’m sure, but I thought of something a friend used to say about that particular brand of religion — that it was like “looking at the ground with a flashlight when the whole universe was around you waiting to be noticed.” Walking to the beach later, I was thinking about how my own idea of God was so mutable, and that even though I pray, most of the time I haven’t a clue to whom I’m praying.

And I like it that way. Sometimes God is Art, Music and Children and that is more than good enough. Ruminating on these things, I thought of a phrase — “the pantheon of my religious desires” — and I wrote it in my notebook. That line is probably too sophomore-English-major precious, but this is how songs begin for me. Sometimes.

John Stewart’s death followed the death last summer of another dear friend, Eric Wishnie, who tumbled from the roof of his apartment building in the West Village, after an unsuccessful struggle with addiction. His death followed the death of Kurt Vonnegut last April. I knew Kurt slightly — he was not a close friend, but his wife Jill is, and I felt his loss mainly as a fan, but also partly through her.

All this is preamble to say that I went to see my friend Joe Henry perform at Lincoln Center in early February, a few weeks after John’s death.

Sitting in the audience, I felt my songwriting engine get turned on by hearing Joe, wonderful Joe. Sitting in the audience, I lifted my head from where it had been glued on that little flashlight circle of the mundane and torturous and my scary adventures in pain and neurosurgery. I went home and started writing about John and Eric, with Kurt’s signature phrase “so it goes” in my head.

(Next week: the results.)

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Re: mp3 - new song with Rosanne Cash

Postby johnfoyle » Fri May 23, 2008 12:57 am

Hear via this link -

'Excerpt: Unnamed new song, performed by Cash, Costello and Kristofferson'


http://measureformeasure.blogs.nytimes. ... -beholder/

New York Times

Image
From left to right, Elvis Costello, John Leventhal, Rosanne Cash and Kris Kristofferson. (Photo: Courtesy of Rosanne Cash)

May 22, 2008, 10:29 pm
The Ear of the Beholder

By Rosanne Cash


I have a friend who has two grown children. She is estranged from her son, who has many egregious complaints about my friend, and vivid tales of childhood neglect and various other appalling maternal offenses. Her daughter, on the other hand, assures my heartbroken friend that the son has an overactive imagination combined with a need to blame everyone else for his own problems and that in fact, the stories of her failings as a parent never occurred. Who owns the truth?

In my own life, there was a Hollywood movie made about my family: my father’s drug addiction, the spectacular dissolution of my parents’ marriage, the genesis of the romantic relationship between my father and stepmother, my birth and the birth of my sisters, and my father’s rise to fame. This was all covered in less than two hours. If you went through this film with a fine-toothed fact-checker, you would emerge safely on the side of a non-litigious wide release.

But is it the truth? Not mine. Certainly not my mother’s, and to some degree, not even my father’s. It’s a pastiche, an impression. An amalgamation of facts strung together, even as a poetic narrative, is not necessarily the same thing as the truth.

In my last column, I wrote about the songwriting workshop I used to teach, and how some students were so attached to the facts that it hindered the quality of their writing. I encouraged them to use poetic license, and give up the facts if they had to, to improve their lyrics. One comment sent in by a reader struck me:

…for those of us interested in becoming more honest with ourselves as we mature, I think it is more important to put away our creative fictions and cut to the soul of the matter when writing. Just because you are more interested in “rhyme scheme errors” than the integrity of the relationship between fact and expression, you shouldn’t extinguish the passion for honesty that lives within your younger, more intuitive students.
— Posted by Geoff Baker


Ouch. I have spent a lifetime in the service of creative fiction, as well as non-fiction ornamented by fiction, so let me elaborate even further. The “truth” (or “honesty”) and the “facts” are not necessarily the same, they are not necessarily equal and one often requires the suspension of the other. This may not be the case in higher math or on Wall Street (or, actually, it may work there as well, but I’m clueless about that) but it is an immutable “truth” in art and music that facts are not necessarily the best indicators of the deepest human experience.

The table where you found the suicide note, the cup of coffee that turned cold because you were distracted in a painful reverie staring out the old wavy-glass window at the rain dripping off the eaves, the seashell left in the coat pocket from the last time you were at that favorite spot at the ocean, when it all came clear that you were at the right place with the wrong man, the letters, the photos, the marbles and jewels — all these physical, material, real-world artifacts carry poetic weight and should be used liberally in songwriting. These are the facts that convey truth to me.

The exact words he said, who was right or wrong, whether he relapsed on the 7th or the 10th, why exactly she does what she does, the depth and weight and timbre of the feelings, whether Love Heals Everything — these aren’t facts, these are ever-changing blobs of emotional mercury, and when you are working in rhyme, it can be much more powerful and resonant to write about the shards of the coffee cup than about the feeling that caused him to throw it across the room. You are better off moving the furniture than you are directly analyzing the furniture maker. This is to say nothing of the fact that the lyrical content of songs is by definition wholly entwined with melody, rhythm, tone and possibly a backbeat, and these carry their own authority.

Recently, I wrote a song with Kris Kristofferson and Elvis Costello. It was a wild idea I had while I was lying around recovering from surgery this past winter. They are both friends — I’ve known Kris since my childhood — and Elvis and I had just written a song together by email. (He called it “Song With Rose” as a working title, and when it came time to record it on his new record, “Momofuku,” he kept the eponymous title, which delighted me). I asked them separately if they would be interested in recording together, the three of us, and they were both game.

We started talking about this in February. We found that the only day in a six-month window when the three of us would be in New York at the same time, without obligations, was April 5th. I booked the studio, not knowing what we would do. As the date got closer, I started to get a little nervous and thought maybe my initial idea of recording old songs of ours together might not have the fresh energy and originality I was looking for. Elvis and John Leventhal, my husband and frequent collaborator and producer, kept mentioning that they hoped we could write something together that day, but that also made me anxious. It seemed too much pressure for one day.

I had a song that was incomplete, but a great idea, that I had started writing when I was halfway through recording “Black Cadillac.” It never really worked, and last year John picked it up again, streamlined it musically and suggested some lyric changes — actually lyric deletions, as he thought it was too wordy. I pared the first verse down to this:

You want love
But it’s never deep enough
You want life
But it’s never long enough
You want peace
Like it’s something you can buy
You want time
But you’re content to watch it fly


I loved the song, but it was still incomplete and didn’t seem to have a home. John thought this would be a great song to write with the gents, and so I sent the first verse by e-mail to Elvis and to Kris (by way of his wife, Lisa, as Kris doesn’t do e-mail), to see if they would be interested in finishing it with us.

Elvis responded immediately, and within a couple days had e-mailed back a second verse, and some ideas for bridges. I loved his verse (“You want imagination but you cannot pretend…”), and we began a dialogue about where it should go. Nothing from Kris, who was touring in Europe.

We waited.

On April 4th, the day before the session, Lisa sent an e-mail saying, “Here are his thoughts so far…” and a verse from Kris that raised the hair on the back of my head and brought instant tears to my eyes. I sent it to Elvis, fingers shaking, and he wrote back within minutes, his excitement and exclamation points jumping off the screen. It was perfect.

It all came together seamlessly the next day, in a way that I’ve seldom experienced in 30 years of recording. It was like alchemy. It was eight hours of magic (and I never use that word). Elvis tinkered with his verses a bit, we divided up the vocal parts and the three of us stood in a circle with the three musicians — John, Zev Katz and Joe Bonadio — and recorded the song. It still doesn’t have a proper title, or a home, but it is a thing of beauty. (Regarding the title, I suggested “Free Will,” Kris suggested “Faith and Free Will,” and Elvis was concerned that anything with “free will” would remind people of a movie about a whale; so right now we’re calling it “April 5th,” because that’s when we recorded it.) A few people who have heard it have said that even though the lyrics are uplifting, even elegiac, the song makes them cry, and they are not sure why. I had the same experience, and I’m not sure why, either. There are no “facts” in these lyrics, no literal references to our lives, beyond our combined assimilated experience and unstated values.

We are so deeply limited by language, and so ennobled by it. Songs are the attempt to convey what is under and behind language, and so it is counter-productive, if not counter-intuitive, to clutch at exactitudes of circumstance that retreat further in meaning the more desperate we become to quantify them.

My friend Joe Henry says that songwriting is not about self-expression (ewwww), but about discovery. I am of entirely the same mind, which is why I recoil against the attempt to categorize “personal” songs of mine as diary pages and why I resist that niggling insistence on the facts. Self-expression without craft is for toddlers. Real artistic accomplishment requires a suspension of certitude. E.L. Doctorow said that “writing is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go.” He may not have been referring specifically to songwriting, but it applies. Great songwriting is not a poor man’s poetry, or a distant cousin to “real” writing. It requires the same discipline and craft. Bright flashes of inspiration can initiate it, but it cannot be completed that way. (That is not to say that all songwriting is important and good, just as not all fiction is important or good. I don’t think anyone would put “Like a Rolling Stone” or my dad’s “Big River” (a truly great piece of American poetry wedded to a wicked, swampy backbeat) in the same category as The Archies’ “Sugar, Sugar” (it is what it is).

But in the space where truth and fact diverge, a larger question arises: if the facts don’t lead us to meaning, what does? Perhaps a willingness to live with questions, not answers, and the confidence to ascribe meaning where we find it, with our own instincts as guide. I should approach my writing as if I am meeting someone for the first time, and have no idea what he will say or what kind of mood he is in. If you already know entirely what you want to say, and want to document an “honest” rehash of what happened and why, then I still maintain that you are better off taking up jurisprudence.

I appreciate my readers’ instinct to protect my songwriting students and their attempts to stay honest, but in songwriting, as in painting, photo-realism is only one style; it is not the litmus test for everything else. In many great songs a larger, universal modicum of truth is revealed and resonates on a personal level with the listener, even when the facts make no sense at all. Sometimes especially when the facts make no sense at all. And, if everything goes well, you can also dance to it.

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Re: mp3 - new song with Rosanne Cash

Postby jmm » Fri May 23, 2008 5:09 am

Amazing, thanks John

Let's hope there are more "magic number" collaborations coming
I too am a limited, primitive kind of man

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Re: mp3 - new song with Rosanne Cash

Postby And No Coffee Table » Fri May 23, 2008 11:28 am

Direct link for the "April 5th" MP3:
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/podcasts/2 ... tello2.mp3

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Re: mp3 - new song with Rosanne Cash

Postby johnfoyle » Sun Jun 15, 2008 1:09 pm

Elvis' journal account of this -

http://www.elviscostello.com/web/guest/ ... urce=27665

Returning to New York, I cut a song with Rosanne Cash and Kris Kristofferson, in which we each wrote a verse. Rose's husband, John Leventhal played some beautiful guitar on the track and made the whole affair go like a dream.

I think we were all surprised that our voices fit together as they did. Perhaps we'll form a supergroup; I hear they're coming back. We could call it "C.C.K.", as it sounds like an old Soviet republic.

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Re: mp3 - new song with Rosanne Cash

Postby johnfoyle » Mon Feb 02, 2009 1:44 pm


sweetest punch
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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April 5th

Postby sweetest punch » Mon Feb 08, 2010 1:25 pm

The three plan to record an entire album: http://www.startribune.com/entertainmen ... page=2&c=y

The New York-based singer/songwriter also has hatched two projects of original songs -- one in collaboration with Joe Henry and Billy Bragg, the other as a trio with Kris Kristofferson and Elvis Costello. "We wrote and recorded two songs already," she said of the latter group.
Since you put me down, it seems i've been very gloomy. You may laugh but pretty girls look right through me.

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April 5th

Postby sweetest punch » Mon Feb 08, 2010 4:59 pm

http://www.theboot.com/2010/02/08/kris- ... -costello/

Kris Kristofferson, Rosanne Cash, Elvis Costello in Super Group?

The term 'super group' is arguably an understatement for this collaboration between country and rock legends. Kris Kristofferson, Rosanne Cash and Elvis Costello are teaming up for new music.

"[The three of us] wrote three songs together and recorded them already," Rosanne tells Spinner. "We performed one of those songs on Elvis' show, 'Spectacle.' We've started this project, and we really like writing together. It was kind of a zone of magic recording these songs. But we all live in three different cities, and to get everyone in the same city, it could take a decade to finish an album!"

In the same Spinner interview, Rosanne also revealed some other potential musical collaborations happening this year with country-rock artists Joe Henry and Billy Bragg. "Joe is a really close friend of mine, and I adore Billy," she says. "So the three of us are saying 2010 is the year we're going to do the Bragg/Cash/Henry project ... whatever that turns out to be."

As for the Cash/Kristofferson/Costello project, this is one of many collaborations between the three friends. Elvis joins Rosanne on 'Heartaches by the Number,' a track from Rosanne's latest album, 'The List.' And just this past December, Kris, Rosanne and Elvis announced they will be featured in an upcoming musical, 'Ghost Brothers of Darkland County,' set to debut later this year.
Since you put me down, it seems i've been very gloomy. You may laugh but pretty girls look right through me.

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby And No Coffee Table » Sun Feb 27, 2011 2:46 pm

Image

Rosanne Cash tweets this photo with the comment "I wrote a song w/ these 2 gents, will be on my next EMI record."

In a followup, she says the baby food in Elvis' hands was for "feeding his toddlers, out of frame."

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby MOJO » Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:29 am

Yeah, right on... Best song ever. Thank you, KK, RC, and EC. I am content to listen.

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby docinwestchester » Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:05 am

Nice version with KK and the 'canes:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVse9V0-3ok

Charming moment when Kris forgets the words and turns to EC for help.

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby Top balcony » Wed Mar 09, 2011 12:14 pm

MOJO wrote:Yeah, right on... Best song ever. Thank you, KK, RC, and EC. I am content to listen.



I have previously stated " I love this song"

... still do

Colin Top Balcony

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby And No Coffee Table » Wed Jan 16, 2013 9:31 pm

Rosanne Cash has posted a link on her Facebook page to the full-length studio version of "April 5th."

Rosanne Cash wrote:Good news: So many people have asked me where to hear the song I wrote and recorded with Elvis Costello and Kris Kristofferson. We performed it live on Elvis' television show 'Spectacle' shortly after writing it in 2008, but it's never been released or performed anywhere else. My lovely webmistress (I love that word) at Flyleaf Creative just uploaded it to my Soundcloud (I love that word too).

The song is called 'April 5th' and here it is:

https://soundcloud.com/rosannecash


Or a more direct link:
https://soundcloud.com/rosannecash/02-a ... with-elvis

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby krm » Thu Jan 17, 2013 1:40 am

finally!

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby charliestumpy » Thu Jan 17, 2013 3:47 am

Thankyou.

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby And No Coffee Table » Thu Jan 17, 2013 11:59 am

http://www.facebook.com/RosanneCash/pos ... 1797385336

Rosanne Cash wrote:A little update on the track I recorded with Kris and Elvis which is now on (in?) my Soundcloud. (Click BandPage above)
The song is called 'April 5th' because that's the date we recorded it (April 5th, 2008, to be exact), and the reason we haven't released it is because three different record labels are involved and it's a legal tangle. Kris and Elvis and I are really happy to stream the song for a few weeks and I'm determined at some point to release it for download, along with another song we wrote and recorded that hasn't seen the light of day yet!

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby cwr » Thu Jan 17, 2013 12:09 pm

THIS IS GREAT.

Elvis just tweeted the link to the song on Rosanne's SoundCloud page.

This move-- posting the song online-- seems to be more Rosanne's doing than Elvis', but he at least went along with it. THIS IS PROGRESS.

My only wish is that there were some way for us to all actually buy the song. I'm sure there will be soon. I'm pretty sure Elvis needs to have the experience of tweeting out a song and then having a lot of people BUY it that way before he will maybe get excited about putting out songs that way.

Everybody on this message board who's on Twitter should retweet Elvis' tweet about it. I feel like the guy needs some positive reinforcement with regards to using The Internet to release new music, and every little bit helps.

(I know it's purely a generational thing-- as much as I love the instant gratification and surprise of waking up and instantly having this song to listen to, I sorely miss the days when I would look forward to Brutal Youth for months and then driving home from the record store on a Tuesday morning with a newly purchased CD that I could wait to unwrap and listen to. I'm sure that it must be hard for Elvis to compare the experience of releasing music in 2013 to what he did for 30+ years. When I think of how nostalgic I get for one method of BUYING music, it must be a hundred times harder to let go of the entire way of releasing music when it's the thing you do for a living and the Music Industry As You Knew It just basically vanishes.)

But I'm hopeful that if a song like this can maybe get some attention-- and boy, it's certainly strong enough-- maybe some of Costello's friends and collaborators can show him the way forward.

BY THE WAY: I think this is some of EC's finest singing on record in a while, I think. I love it when he confidently busts out that falsetto in the studio. And then he also gets to belt out some lines as well. And the lyric is beautiful. I hope the rumors of them making a whole album together end up being true.

I feel like, for older artists with small-but-not-insubstantial fan bases, the idea of three of them making an album together is a smart idea. Rosanne's fans buy it, we buy it, Kristofferson's fans buy it...

UPDATED TO ADD: the news that this hasn't been released because "three different record labels are involved" makes me believe that Elvis needs to shed his record label (is he still connected to Hear Music) unless they're going to promise to put his next effort on sale at the counter at Starbucks again! The interview from New Zealand makes it sound like he's happy with his life (singing live and time with his family) and gloomy about the prospect of making any more records (he refers to himself as having "negligible cultural significance.") As always, I believe it when he talks like this, no matter how often he goes to this well and then reverses himself... I now believe he really is checked out of making records, possibly forever. (Or at least until he changes his mind!)

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby Jack of All Parades » Thu Jan 17, 2013 12:45 pm

I do not Tweet[generational thing] so I will leave that up to you to do as to pulling him forward. But I sure resoundlingly second your suggestions and speculations. I, too, lean towards taking him at his word. Stay out of the studio- he has little to prove- build up solid material and from time to time seed the 'soundcloud' with the results. That would work for me. Fine song by the way and I too appreciate the usage of the falsetto- he can be most effective vocally when he goes that route. Lyrically it does not hurt when you are collaborating with another individual who is not a slouch with words. I appreciate this particular song. It easily could have appeared on "National Ransom" in place of one of the lessor songs that made the cut.
"....there's a merry song that starts in 'I' and ends in 'You', as many famous pop songs do....'

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby cwr » Thu Jan 17, 2013 1:15 pm

This is probably one of the most "positive" songs Costello has ever had a hand in, right? I mean, straightforward and kind of inspirational, yet not sappy. It really works.

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby Jack of All Parades » Thu Jan 17, 2013 1:25 pm

Very much so! It does not wear its heart on its sleeve and exude saccharine like say that weak effort "Sparkling Day". It very much has a positive message that could well accompany "Voice In the Dark" or other such efforts.
"....there's a merry song that starts in 'I' and ends in 'You', as many famous pop songs do....'

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Re: Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Roseanne Cash: April

Postby Pigalle » Thu Jan 17, 2013 2:25 pm

Some of you might find this page of use: http://offliberty.com/


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