EC at Milwaukee Summerfest 2006

Pretty self-explanatory
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snarling pup
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EC at Milwaukee Summerfest 2006

Postby snarling pup » Fri Mar 24, 2006 2:02 pm

http://www.summerfest.com/media/newsrel ... php?id=174

Diverse Lineup to Play Summerfest 2006
March 24, 2006

MILWAUKEE — March 24, 2006 – Officials at Milwaukee World Festival, Inc., the producers of Summerfest, are excited to announce several acts for Summerfest 2006. This list includes both performances at the Marcus Amphitheater and on the 10 grounds stages throughout Henry Meier Festival Park.

Mary J. Blige will take the Marcus Amphitheater stage on July 3. Since her debut album was released in 1992, fans have been mesmerized by her ability to combine R&B with an edgy rap sound. Her latest album Breakthrough, released in December of 2005, debuted at #1 on both the R&B Albums and Billboard Top 200 albums charts. The show will begin at 8 p.m. with a performance by soulful R&B singer/songwriter Ne-Yo, whose latest single “So Sick” recently skyrocketed to number one on several Billboard charts. Tickets for this show go on sale Saturday, April 1 at Noon. Ticket prices are $49.75, $42.75 and $34.75. A limited number of free, general admission lawn seats will be available the day of the show on a first-come, first-served basis.

On July 2 Nine Inch Nails brings its Live: With_Teeth_2006 tour to the Amphitheater. Although singer/producer/multi-instrumentalist Trent Reznor took a five-year break from the road, 2005 saw him touring again in support of With Teeth, the band’s first album since 1999. Now fans are eagerly awaiting the April 4 U.S. release of the band’s newest single “Every Day is Exactly the Same.” Bauhaus, the founding fathers of Goth rock, will open this 7 p.m. show with their dark, minimalist post-punk rock. Tickets go on sale April 8 at 11 a.m. Ticket prices are $49.75, $39.75 and $32.25. A limited number of free, general admission lawn seats will be available the day of the show on a first-come, first-served basis.

The reigning Country Music Association Entertainer of the Year, Alan Jackson, brings his classic country sound to the Amphitheater on Saturday, July 8. Alan’s 15-year career, which has seen 96 major industry awards, 43 million album sales and 31 number one hits, speaks for itself. Fans are sure to hear favorites from his latest album, What I Do, along with classics like “Chattahoochee” and “Gone Country.” American Idol and country music fans alike will be thrilled to hear that Carrie Underwood will open the July 8, 7:30 p.m. show. The American Idol 2005 winner’s first album, Some Hearts, was number one on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart for 11 weeks, while her single “Jesus, Take the Wheel” was number one on the Hot Country Songs chart for six weeks. Tickets for this show go on sale April 8 at Noon. Ticket prices are $54.75, $37.25 and $24.75.

Summerfest’s entertainment team is well on its way to securing hundreds of performers from around the world to play at this year’s festival. While the staff is diligently working on scheduling the 11 Marcus Amphitheater performances, they are also hard at work booking the grounds stages with a diverse line-up of national headliners, regional favorites and great up-and-coming talent. Dates, time and specific stage locations of the following acts have yet to be determined, however, these artists are officially signed to perform at Summerfest 2006: The Bravery, Chris Brown, Ryan Cabrera, Alice Cooper, Elvis Costello and The Imposters featuring Allen Toussaint, Los Lonely Boys, Medeski Martin & Wood, Phil Vassar, Yellowcard and The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards. Details on performance specifics will be forthcoming.

Marcus Amphitheater tickets can be purchased at the Marcus Amphitheater Box Office, Ticketmaster Ticket Centers, online at ticketmaster.com and by phone at 414.276.4545 (Milwaukee), 920.494.1414 (Green Bay), 608.255.4646 (Madison), and 608.789.4545 (LaCrosse). TTY service will be available at 800.359.2525. Patrons may also utilize “ticketfast” at ticketmaster.com to print bar coded concert tickets from home. A convenience fee will be added to all ticket purchases.

General Admission Summerfest tickets can be purchased now through Ticketmaster as well. Two-day passes are available for one more week at the discounted rate of only $20. This represents a $10 discount of the evening & weekend gate admission price of $15 for 2006.

Summerfest 2006 will take place June 29 - July 9 from Noon until Midnight daily. This unforgettable live music experience features over 700 performances on 11 stages in 11 days. The food, attractions and activities are as diverse as the musical line ups, offering patrons of all ages a quality festival experience.

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Postby HolyCoatAndHat » Mon Mar 27, 2006 1:24 pm

I've been gone for a while from this board, but the Summerfest news brought me back.

I am excited that Elvis is playing Summerfest!

Here is a little bit of info for you all on how Summerfest works:

There is an admission to get into the Summerfest grounds. Not sure how much it is, but you can check their web page. Once you get in the grounds, all of the stages are free, except the Marcus Amphitheater. There are a few free grass seats available for that also. (At least there used to be.) What you do is you get there early in the day and get a hand stamp.

Anyhow, Elvis is playing at one of the free stages. Which is cool. They are a lot of fun. Sometimes a little too crowded though.

One year, we got into the grounds for free by bringing Box Tops for Education. You would have to check the Summerfest web page to see if they have any specials going on.

In the past, they had a deal where you could park your car at the State Fair grounds and take a shuttle down to the lake front for a small fee.

If you are there on a day when the have fireworks, the show is always cool. They set off the fireworks over lake Michigan.

It is a great festival, so if you are thinking about a vacation, this would be a good summer destination to see Elvis and the Imposters.

Also, if you are a baseball fan, you should check out Miller Park while you are in town. Even if the Brewers are not playing, there is a Friday's in the park that would be open. The Brewers are in town July 3 – 9. Not sure when EC is in town…

And I think that the Miller Brewery still has tours with samples at the end.

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Postby johnfoyle » Wed May 03, 2006 5:06 pm

http://www.summerfest.com/music/artist.php?id=3119

http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=420441
( extract)

The Briggs & Stratton lineup:

• Elvis Costello & the Imposters featuring Allen Toussaint, 8:30 p.m. June 29

The British singer-guitarist was associated with punk and new wave when his debut album, "My Aim is True," came out in 1977. But over the years, Costello has channeled his unflagging energy into a variety of genres, dabbling in country, reggae and the classics. In June, he and New Orleans legend Toussaint will release "The River in Reverse," with the title track about post-Katrina New Orleans.

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Postby HolyCoatAndHat » Thu May 04, 2006 9:31 am

Thanks for the update!

That is opening day of Summerfest too.

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Postby johnfoyle » Sun Jun 25, 2006 9:07 am

http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=439724

Get back to where you once belonged

Summerfest hasn’t given up on ‘dropouts’

By JAN UEBELHERR
juebelherr@journalsentinel.com

Posted: June 23, 2006

Maureen Bradley waved a hand toward the laid-back crowd of wine sippers at Pere Marquette Park for a River Rhythms concert in early June. She surveyed the serenity before her and asked, "If you can go to something like this, why mill around with 100,000 of your closest friends?"
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It was her way of explaining why Summerfest doesn't see her coming around anymore.

The annual party we call Summerfest has 11 days of food, fireworks, shopping, martinis and 10 stages of non-stop music. They accept major credit cards. And did we mention they have martinis?

So what's not to like? For Bradley and other prodigal partyers, it's the crowds - and a few other things.

Understandably, Summerfest president Don Smiley would much rather talk about the 900,000 or so people who do come to the festival each year. Still, it's his job to bring people in, and that includes Summerfest dropouts - especially slightly older people, a group he has said he'd like to "re-invite" to the Big Gig. Last year he called them "people right in the sweet spot of life that have disposable income."

As he heads into the 39th Big Gig, Smiley qualifies that a bit.

"In a nutshell, we're interested in all groups," he says. "We pride ourselves on having music and entertainment that really is attractive to all demographics. Maybe I misrepresented what was on my mind . . . , but it just felt very, very young when I showed up here in '04."

In contrast, much of this year's music is a boomer's dream, with Tom Petty, Paul Simon and Steely Dan among Marcus Amphitheater headliners, and grounds stage shows by the likes of Elvis Costello and Ray Davies.

Still, what about those folks who've sworn off Summerfest for years? What has kept them away? And what would bring them back?
Beer here

It's more like beer everywhere, says 23-year-old Terrisha Randle. She doesn't go to Summerfest because she's "not a beer fan" and doesn't see the point in hanging out with people who "get sloppy drunk."

Same goes for Katelyn O'Neil, a 20-year-old University of Wisconsin-Green Bay student who hasn't been to Summerfest in three years.

"The drinking, the whole social scene, it's not me," she says. "Just regulate it a little better."

And 62-year-old Mike Toffler, who joined Bradley's party at River Rhythms, says he favors the crowds at Festa Italiana and other ethnic fests "because they're not stupidly drunk."

Keeping the drinking under control is a priority for Summerfest, Smiley says. All bartenders must complete a course on responsible serving.

"We want people to enjoy themselves but not get crazy intoxicated," Smiley says. "We'll cut them off."

But he notes that with crowds of up to 90,000 in a day, "it's going to happen here and there."

And, yes, about those crowds.

"We don't want to be trampled by hordes," says Bradley, who won't give her age but describes herself as a baby boomer.

"I just don't like to be shoulder-to-shoulder," says her pal Toffler.

"It's just too much," says grade-school teacher Lyn Lopez, 30. "It's too hard to walk around. It's not enjoyable because of the crowd - the real drunk, intoxicated late-night crowds."

Smiley agrees that bigger crowds aren't a measure of success for Summerfest. But he adds, "It is the world's largest music festival. We are going to draw crowds."

If that's an issue for you, come before 6 p.m. "There's plenty of room to enjoy the grounds," he says.
Staggered start times

Summerfest is always considering the crowd issue, he says. He notes that the new Miller Lite Oasis area not only has better sight lines, new lighting and sound, but is better positioned to avoid "bottlenecking."

Last year Summerfest began to stagger the start times of acts so people didn't all try to get off the grounds at once. Some of this year's headliners have earlier start times, too, particularly on Sunday nights, when people are mindful of the work week ahead.

That's good news for Sandy Manthei, 53, a Thiensville resident who once went to Summerfest "probably 10 out of 11 days." She hasn't been there in four years.

"Most of the main side stage acts start at 10, so it's just not convenient enough," she says. She'd like to see an 8 p.m. start time so she's not tired for work the next day. And she'll find that this year.

And of course, with any music festival, the quality of the acts is always a point of contention.

"Last year they didn't have anyone I wanted to see," Randle says. She'd go to Summerfest if it had rapper T.I. or R&B singer Keyshia Cole, she said.

"If they had more popular music; I'd like to see the Spill Canvas and Damien Rice," O'Neil says. In her view, Summerfest seems to "get bands popular five years ago." She calls them "I remember them" bands.

"They should have more new, up-and-coming people," she said.

To Bradley, it's just the opposite. "It's really geared toward young people," she says. "They could have one night that's just reserved for the middle-agers. Bring in Diana Krall, Peter Cincotti, Michael Bublé."


Music and money

For 40-year-old Angela Hayes of Shorewood, it's about both music and money.

"I'd pay the high admission price (and) deal with the parking if there were musical acts I wanted to see," Hayes says. "I feel it's too pop-based, too popular and mainstream. I would deal with the crowds to see Tori Amos, Joe Jackson or the Producers" (a college circuit band from a few years back).

Her husband, Nick Hayes, 44, explains their absence this way:

"We're just past that age group that seems to be targeted by the place. Loved it, did it when we were kids, but now we have kids," he says. "We would pack up our kids and take them down there if music from our genre was being played or if it were fun for kids. That's where we are in life."

Summerfest entertainment director Bob Babisch thinks people get an impression of the lineup one year and tend to stick with it. He's surprised at Randle's comment about the lack of rap and hip-hop.

"There's all kinds of good stuff - Anthony Hamilton, Chris Brown, Common, Mary J. Blige," he says. He concedes that there's no "hard-core hip-hop" but says he's not sure it would fly at Summerfest. "You have a situation where you have families," he says.

Of Bradley's belief that Summerfest is aimed at the young, he says, "She has to go look at our schedule." He rattled off acts that would appeal to boomers: Davies, Creedence Clearwater Revisited, Foreigner.

Bookings depend on who is touring and whether they fit into the 11-day window of Summerfest. Babisch says he tried for both Cole and Bublé but they weren't available.

"We put a little puzzle together here," he says. "You try to make it as eclectic as possible."

As for ticket prices, Smiley points out that the $15 ticket price (up from $12) applies only on weeknights and weekends at the gate. From noon to 4 p.m. weekdays, adults pay $8 at the gate (and that's reduced from the $12 it had been). Besides, if you plan a bit you can get in free on special admission days, he says.

But in the end, Smiley knows he can't bring every one-time Summerfester back.

"Some of those people, you'll never turn 'em around," he says. "They just don't want to get in the car."

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Postby johnfoyle » Fri Jun 30, 2006 3:07 am

http://www2.jsonline.com/site/photograp ... &catid=149

ImageImage

Image

Image
Photo/Michele Jokinen


http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=445266

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel


Review: Elvis Costello and Allen Toussaint
Posted: June 30, 2006

When a British rock genius starts cooking with a New Orleans R&B legend, the result is a musical stew with tasty little tidbits like razor-sharp guitars, Fats Domino-inspired blues licks and a horn section that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand straight up.


Tom Petty and Pearl Jam may have been the evening's amphitheater headliners, but Elvis Costello and Allen Toussaint delivered what likely will go down as Summerfest's best overall show.

Brandishing a honey-blond Fender Telecaster, Costello and his combo, the Imposters, kicked off Thursday's headlining show at the Briggs & Stratton Big Backyard with the Nick Lowe classic "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding" before bringing the legendary Toussaint onstage.

Backed by the fabulous Crescent City Horns, Costello and Toussaint served up "Tears, Tears and More Tears," "Freedom for the Stallion," "The Sharpest Thorn" as well as the title track from their recently released CD, "The River in Reverse."

Throughout the evening, Costello's distinctive, rough-edged voice blended flawlessly with Toussaint's silky-smooth vocals. Vintage Costello crowd-pleasers like "Pump It Up" and "(I Don't Want to Go to) Chelsea" finished off a great set before a packed stage.

Larry Widen, Special to the Journal Sentinel

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Postby Turquoise Pajamas Pt Deux » Fri Jun 30, 2006 5:21 pm

Since there's been little EC discussion today, I just want to step up to the plate and state that I am a fan of Elvis Costello. :lol:

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Postby clairequilty » Fri Jun 30, 2006 6:45 pm

I swore off live Elvis a few years ago when my brother, a few friends and I left a Chicago concert after 2 or 3 straight Bush bashing interludes. I happen to agree with most all of Bush's policies on the war the economy, mostly everything except Religion and immigration (am I even allowed to have these opinions on this board?)

But my brother decided to give Elvis another chance last night at MW's Summerfest. Six songs into the set EC armed and fired with the typical Bush bashing that most every other bloated entertainer espouses of late. Bush has done "nothing" for New Orleans, etc, etc, etc.

Is this substantiated? Is this true? "Nothing"? I mean, Bush 41 and Clinton are supposedly heavily involved in mustering up aid and support for the Katrina victims and I have not heard any of this vitriol from them (admittedly, Bush 41 aint gonna do it, but if true I would certainly expect to hear it from Bill).

I fear that Elvis has retreated into the knee jerk bomb throwing that he has managed to avoid for most of his career.

If he's gonna make these statements I'd just like to see him back them up, instead of relying on his Bush Bobblehead doll.

I'd expect this sh*t from Cher, orr Barbra, but come on Elvis, you're better than this.

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Postby Who Shot Sam? » Fri Jun 30, 2006 6:56 pm

clairequilty wrote:I swore off live Elvis a few years ago when my brother, a few friends and I left a Chicago concert after 2 or 3 straight Bush bashing interludes. I happen to agree with most all of Bush's policies on the war the economy, mostly everything except Religion and immigration (am I even allowed to have these opinions on this board?


You're allowed to, but we may question your sanity! I imagine EC's not too bothered by a few Bushies walking out on one of his shows. EC fan Bush supporters must number in the teens - globally.
Mother, Moose-Hunter, Maverick

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Postby clairequilty » Fri Jun 30, 2006 7:01 pm

Who Shot Sam? wrote:
clairequilty wrote:I swore off live Elvis a few years ago when my brother, a few friends and I left a Chicago concert after 2 or 3 straight Bush bashing interludes. I happen to agree with most all of Bush's policies on the war the economy, mostly everything except Religion and immigration (am I even allowed to have these opinions on this board?


You're allowed to, but we may question your sanity! I imagine EC's not too bothered by a few Bushies walking out on one of his shows. EC fan Bush supporters must number in the teens - globally.


Absolutely. Question away, but this is exactly what I expected. Any opinion that doesn't fall in line with yours is, out of the box, questionably insane. Typical, fucking typical.

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Postby Richard » Fri Jun 30, 2006 7:13 pm

We drove to Milwaukee yesterday to see Elvis at Summerfest. Strange as it may seem I was almost a reluctant participant in the journey. The last time I saw Elvis was Chicago in 2002, where I was disappointed. Elvis let that shrill tone in his voice dominate the performance. Last year I had tickets for his Minneapolis show which he cancelled due to illness.

After 10 or so Elvis concerts, from 1982 to 2002, I thought I had no reason to see another.

I start with all these disclaimers because I fear there may be other board members with the same opinion.

So if you want a message here it is.

If you love Elvis - SEE THIS SHOW!
If you love music - SEE THIS SHOW!
If you love life - SEE THIS SHOW!

The 10 musicians on stage are all playing at the peak of their powers.

If you watch The Last Waltz or Stop Making Sense & wish you could have been there. Or pine for all the classic concerts you have missed, then you want to see this tour. This is one that is going to replay in your fading mind as you sink into dotage many years from now.

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Postby Richard » Fri Jun 30, 2006 7:38 pm

As for the Bush comments. It was about 10 seconds of a 90+ minutes show.

Elvis explains that the show lacks the pyrotechnics you may see at other concerts. His concert, he explains, makes up for it by having an Action Figure of President George W Bush. Then he points at a 6" doll proped up next to him. "Actual size" he says grinning. Finishing with, "And like most Action Figures it does absolutely nothing."

Excuse my paraphrasing, but that is my recollection.

I thought it was a cute joke & you would have to be hell-bent on wanting to be offended if that spoiled what was a magnificent musical experience.
Last edited by Richard on Fri Jun 30, 2006 8:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby clairequilty » Fri Jun 30, 2006 7:53 pm

Richard wrote:As for the Bush comments. It was about 10 seconds of a 90+ minutes show.

Elvis explains that the show lacks the pyrotechnics you may see at other concerts. His concert, he explains, makes up for it by having an Action Figure of President George W Bush. Then he points at a 6' doll proped up next to him. "Actual size" he says grinning. Finishing with, "And like most Action Figures it does absolutely nothing."

Excuse my paraphrasing, but that is my recollection.

I thought it was a cute joke & you would have to be hell-bent on wanting to be offended if that spoiled what was a magnificent musical experience.


I wouldn't question your recollection, nor would I question whether the show was magnificent, I'm sure it was; I've seen EC probably 30 times or so and have never been disappointed.

I just question Elvis on his recent between song political excursions. Hey, the world is a complicated place, and if what "Sam" said is true, that you can count EC Bush fans in the world on one hand, then what exactly is his point of preaching to the choir with these comments? It's trite and pandering. It is beneath him.

I've disagreed with a lot of his politics over the past 30 years, but could always appreciate the messages as they were delivered masterfully through his music. But this is amatuer hour.

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Postby Who Shot Sam? » Fri Jun 30, 2006 8:15 pm

Don't fucking go then. Why should he censor himself for your sake? I wouldn't go to a Toby Keith concert and expect to feel at home. If you like the music then suck it up and put the politics aside. If not, then go find something else that aligns better with your views and still has some musical integrity (good luck with that).

And how many fingers do you have? I can't count to the teens on one hand (or even two for that matter). Math apparently isn't the Bushies' strong suit.
Mother, Moose-Hunter, Maverick

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Postby pophead2k » Fri Jun 30, 2006 8:55 pm

Clairequilty,

I generally stay out of political discussions these days, but I have to give you my impression of ECs forays into the admittedly complicated politics of Katrina and the various government reactions and inactions to it. However, as a citizen of New Orleans at the time of the disaster, and one who is still closely vested in its future, I feel I need to make a point or two.

First, in the interest of total disclosure: I do not like GWB, nor did I vote for him, nor would I ever vote for any candidate who is as clearly unsuited for the particular job he holds. However, I do not hold him entirely responsible for the post-Katrina disaster. Clearly, there is plenty of blame to go around, from the mayor to the governor, to various cabinet members and underlings, and ultimately, to the president himself. He admitted as much when he stood in Jackson Square and shouldered responsibility (which I applauded him for) and for swearing that the federal government would not turn its back on the Gulf Coast and New Orleans (which I heartily applauded him for and gave him the benefit of the doubt for).

Sir, I defy you to go to New Orleans and tell me that the federal government has lived up to its promise. Fully eighty percent of the city is a wasteland. A complete fucking wasteland. Even in parts of the city that were relatively unscathed, fires are burning with little water pressure to combat them. Garbage fills the streets EVERYWHERE except the tourist districts, creating a health hazard most can only have nightmares about.

Is this situation solely the fault of the White House? Of course not. Local leaders have reverted to 'old time' New Orleans politics and the state seems confused and the democratic governor is also particularly unqualified for her position. However, that does not excuse the president, FEMA, Homeland Security, and the Congress from fulfilling the promise made by GWB in Jackson Square in the aftermath. As a matter of public health, the Feds should be there cleaning up. If there is something holding this up, GWB should know the reason why.

The people of New Orleans are walking wounded. I have no question in my mind that most of us are suffering from some form of post-traumatic stress. The citizens of the Gulf Coast have been largely left and forgotten by their government, even as individual citizens, teens on spring break, churches and the much-maligned national media refuse to forget and are very interested in helping and holding the government accountable. We are Americans. Any American who visited New Orleans and saw what I saw one week ago in the 9th Ward, at the Lakefront, and in the entire east would be sickened and appalled.

As for EC, he would be doing the New Orleans musicans on the stage with him a grave disservice in not criticizing the government in this instance. For Christ's sake, the whole record is about 'the situation' in New Orleans and I felt that EC showed remarkable restraint in not writing 12 songs jabbing a hyperbolic and accusing finger at the particular politicians he doesn't like. He let the lovely songs of AT do the talking for the most part and keeps his personal anger on a steady burn as opposed to 'flamethrower' setting. This tour, this album, this music, is designed to remind people about the horrors of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. The president chose to make a promise, he should be held accountable to it.

Go to New Orleans. See for yourself. If you aren't righteously pissed when you see the city, then there's nothing I can say that would reach you anyway. I respect your opinions, and I'm sorry that EC's politics have soured you on his music. But go to New Orleans. I don't think you'd argue too much with his feelings this time around.

Sincerely,
Dave Becker
Displaced resident of MidCity, New Orleans

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Postby Turquoise Pajamas Pt Deux » Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:15 pm

I tend to lean towards some sort of libertarian/conservative amalgam. I could choose to let Elvis' occasional Bush rants upset me. But I don't. Why? Because I don't go to his shows or buy his music to learn about politics. I go to his shows and buy his music because, in my opinion, he is the best songwriter and performer of the past 30 years - period. When El seethed "Admit you lied and bring the boys back home" last year, I applauded with the rest of the folks. I did so not to fit in with the mostly left-leaning folks here in the Northeast U.S., but because I appreciated the passion behind the message he was communicating. It was a genuine artistic expression that happened to reflect one political viewpoint on the event of the moment. I also agreed with the notion that the "boys" needed to come home - but that's not relevant here. What is relevant is that regardless of one's political views, the works of artists of all shapes and sizes can be appreciated if the quality of the art is intact. Elvis' work is, more often than not, outstanding and most certainly intact. If you can't stomach a Bush bobble-head doll or a couple of Bush pot-shots then simply don't go to his shows. Stay home and watch Charlton Heston movies or the 700 Club instead.

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Postby HolyCoatAndHat » Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:16 pm

I was at the show at Summerfest also and I thought it was great!

We arrived about 3/4 of the way through Jackie Greene and we were lucky enough to get a picnic table to stand on to see the show. I thought that the horns added a lot to the show. Especially the old classics like (I Don't Want To Go To) Chelsea, Allison and Watching the Detectives. The River in Reverse songs also worked well live.

Apparently, there was a power outage at the Fest grounds for 3 or 4 hours before we got there. Does anyone that was there know if this had an affect on the bands that were there earlier? Or did they have generator backup so these shows could go on as scheduled?

As far as the politics go, just let it go. Some of my best friends are on the opposite end of the political spectrum that I am on. It makes for some interesting debates sometimes, but that is healthy. You should be happy that you live in a country were an artist can voice his opinion on stage without fear of repercussions.

And the fireworks after the show were great too.

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Postby martinfoyle » Sat Jul 01, 2006 3:05 pm

According to this blogger, Elvis seems to have been a big hit with the ladies at this show.

but i got to see elvis costello last night at summerfest with ben. because we got there so late, we were stuck in the very back with a pretty crummy view. it wasn't so bad though because we were right next to two extremely wasted 45 year old women who were not only sporting an unnecessary amount of cleave, but dancing erratically and waaay to sexually for their age. so at least we were entertained.


I wonder how they felt about the political comments.

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Postby verbal gymnastics » Mon Jul 03, 2006 4:04 am

The blogger should have asked :lol:
Love is the one thing we can save

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setlist

Postby snarling pup » Mon Jul 03, 2006 9:11 am

Here's the setlist, although the order may not be correct:

(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding?
Monkey To Man
Chelsea
A Certain Girl
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LessThanZero
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Postby LessThanZero » Mon Jul 03, 2006 7:48 pm

clairequilty wrote:I swore off live Elvis a few years ago when my brother, a few friends and I left a Chicago concert after 2 or 3 straight Bush bashing interludes.



I was at that show, and I remember it well. Are you sure you and your friend weren't forced to leave by security for repeatedly calling Elvis the F-A-G word?

I remember it very well, because those people ruined it. Also, because:

- I brought my extremely right-wing friend to the show, who I was introducing to Elvis. He could stomach God's Comic. He just smiled and blew it off.

- I didn't blow it off, I thought it was great. After all, our president did lie to us, and his lies were a hell of a lot more costly than Clinton's were. And God doesn't forgive blasphemy as easily as he does everything else...or so I've read.

- My car broke down before I even got out of Chicgao. :)
Loving this board since before When I Was Cruel.

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verbal gymnastics
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Postby verbal gymnastics » Tue Jul 04, 2006 3:59 am

LessThanZero wrote:- I brought my extremely right-wing friend to the show, who I was introducing to Elvis.


Now there's an interesting sentence...
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Goody2Shoes
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Postby Goody2Shoes » Wed Jul 05, 2006 11:26 am

martinfoyle wrote:
it wasn't so bad though because we were right next to two extremely wasted 45 year old women who were not only sporting an unnecessary amount of cleave, but dancing erratically and waaay to sexually for their age. so at least we were entertained.




One wonders just how much "cleave" would be considered the "necessary" amount?
It's a radiation vibe I'm groovin' on

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verbal gymnastics
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Postby verbal gymnastics » Thu Jul 06, 2006 9:48 am

Goody - show us some pictures of yourself in various cleavage guises and we'll tell you. Alternately PM me with the photos :wink: :lol:
Love is the one thing we can save

Goody2Shoes
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Postby Goody2Shoes » Fri Jul 07, 2006 8:28 am

Sorry, Verbal, I'm afraid that wouldn't be prudent. How 'bout some erratic dancing instead?
It's a radiation vibe I'm groovin' on


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