An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

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And No Coffee Table
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An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby And No Coffee Table » Fri Sep 09, 2016 12:55 pm

https://twitter.com/TonySeskus/status/7 ... 6881207298

So cool! Owen Hart Foundation is hosting “An Evening with Elvis Costello” on Dec. 10, 2016 at the Jubilee Auditorium.


https://twitter.com/mrbell_23/status/774280468191588352

Calgary concert announcement: Owen Hart Foundation presents An Evening with @ElvisCostello Dec. 10 at the Jube. Tix next Friday.


http://www.owenhartfoundation.org/
http://www.jubileeauditorium.com

sweetest punch
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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby sweetest punch » Fri Sep 09, 2016 3:30 pm

Since you put me down, it seems i've been very gloomy. You may laugh but pretty girls look right through me.

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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby johnfoyle » Fri Oct 28, 2016 8:30 am


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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby Man out of Time » Fri Oct 28, 2016 9:28 am

Some EC related items to bid for in the related 2016 celebrity online auction, raising money for a good cause:

http://hartauction.com/

Items include:

VIP and show tickets to Elvis' show in Calgary for two people (value $300)
Meet and greet with Elvis Costello (value $700)
Hotel stay for the night of EC's show (part of the annual charity concert for the Owen Hart Foundation).

Elvis Costello painting, 48” x 60” Oil on Canvas (value $3,500)
Signed photograph of Elvis Costello (value $100)

However, these seem to be bundled with other items into two separate packages - the VIP package and the Art package, so you would be bidding on other items too, taking the total stated value of the packages to either £2,925 (VIP) or $7,190 (Art). Of course bids may not reach the stated value, so may be worth a bid if you could get to Calgary in December (for the VIP package) or to the Alberta Ballet and want the painting and signed photo for your wall.

All values in Canadian $ of course...

MOOT

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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby johnfoyle » Fri Dec 02, 2016 3:33 am


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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby johnfoyle » Sat Dec 03, 2016 7:09 am

http://www.leaderpost.com/Entertainment ... story.html

Elvis Costello reflects on nature of song ahead of Calgary show

MIKE BELL
CALGARY HERALD

12.02.2016


When Elvis Costello talks, you listen.

A lot. And attentively.

Not surprisingly, the 62-year-old U.K. artist born Declan Patrick MacManus is a remarkably engaging and entertaining man to listen to, holding court on this particular phone call with a generosity and candour that’s as casual as it is informative.

Calgary fans of the pop rock legend will have an opportunity to witness that for themselves, when Costello returns to town for a Dec. 10 Jubilee Auditorium show in support of the Owen Hart Foundation.

While the concert comes during a period of seeming artistic pause — the last studio album released under his own name was 2010’s National Ransom — it’s actually been a fairly busy time for the musician, who recently released his memoir Unfaithful Music and Disappearing Ink and he’s mounted several different tours, including one this fall that featured the complete performance of Imperial Bedroom, the 1982 classic recorded with band the Attractions.


I spoke, and listened attentively to, Costello prior to his Jubilee show.

Q: What can people in Calgary expect from the show?

A: We’re going to bring the Detour show, which has played in different forms now for the last couple of years. It’s sort of a show I developed little by little, really out of a solo performance and I added elements to it. It ran alongside the completion of my book, so the storytelling element that’s in that book had a parallel development in my show. I was looking for a way to give visual cues to songs. I don’t want to give away every surprise but the set is dominated by a large television set … It’s like a large piece of furniture that sits behind me. You know, when you play a solo performance, I never worry about the fact that the show is going to be too meek and mild. (Laughs) I can kick up quite a fuss on my own and I have lots of different ways to approach it.

But what I found as I went on was is if I use the width of the stage to play in different positions and play in different ways in those positions then the show would be a lot richer. And wind that together with a narrative element that’s in some of the songs, and even in some of my introductions, it became a show not scripted but something that could be different every night and a place where I could play my best known songs in a way that was surprising to me — not because I was turning them on their head necessarily but because they weren’t in a predictable ritual. And more often than not I found that less well-known songs could often shine in a show like this, whereas when you’re up there with the big intimidating rock band and that distance that that creates sometimes, you know it can either be really exciting or it can actually push the audience further away.

Anyway, you’ll see what it is when I get there … A version of the show came to Canada to play (Toronto’s) Massey Hall but it wasn’t in this complete form with the visual elements, it was when I was just going towards the themes of the show in song. So really this is the first time that the show has been seen, as we say now, north of this border.

Q: With this tour, with touring Imperial Bedroom recently, with the book, are you in a pretty comfortable place? Are you in a place where you’re comfortable looking back at your career and your legacy?

A: I think when you actually are at the show it may look that way from the outside … (but) I called the show Detour, I didn’t call it Rearview Mirror. It’s about the songs being alive in the moment. One of the things when you first write a song is you haven’t got any of the arrangement, but it’s sketched out and it’s vivid to you. And that’s what drives you on to go and want to arrange it with a band or — I say arrange, that’s actually too grand a word … But there is something to going to the bones of the thing and see what happens when you try to animate it in different ways. It’s a bit of Dr. Frankenstein moment with songs, they can get up and start walking around tearing up the village if you’re not careful. (Laughs)

I think with regard to Imperial Bedroom, I mean, jazz musicians have access to songs, people like my wife (Canadian Diana Krall), play songs that were written 50 or 60 years ago, but there’s nothing nostalgic about the way she approaches the song. She might refer to things she learned in her apprenticeship as a musician … or refer to people that she’s loved but she’s doing it in the moment. And in the same way I came to terms with the fact that a lot of the music on Imperial Bedroom had never really been played the way it was written. At the time that that record was released, me and my band were about different things. And now the three of us that were part of making that record have all of the accumulation of what we’ve learned from playing music for 40 years and were able to listen to the songs for what they actually are instead of trying to hammer them literally like you would a piece of metal work into a different shape, actually play them for the values in the songs. That takes a little bit of restraint so the power of the song is actually revealed …

A lot of rock ’n’ roll music is about attitude and sometimes it’s great to beat the song up and almost brutalize it because in a live performance it becomes more, I don’t know what word to use. People would use the word “visceral,” but it almost sounds a little bit like “gristle” to me, it sounds a little bit unpleasant. But you know it is something that changes shape in the moment. That said, these songs, and a lot of songs that I have in my catalogue, whether I play them with the band or in the context of Detour, really require you to respect the composition a bit more if you’re going to get anything out of them. I’ve been guilty in the past of trying to force them to be more, bigger or more amplified in every sense of the word than perhaps some of them wanted to be. And it was really a shock to me what happened when we trusted the music I’d written originally and then had the fun of doing it in the moment …

But really the two tours, I had literally two days between finishing the last full run of Detour in North America and beginning Imperial Bedroom. To me it was all part of a big story of music; I didn’t see them as conflict or that different …

So it’s far from a backward looking thing to answer your question in a very roundabout way. (Laughs) It’s a very much in the immediate moment thing, it’s just taking advantage of everything I have at my disposal.

Q: It’s been some time since you’ve released something new. Can we expect to hear some new songs as part of Detour and when can we expect to hear a new Elvis Costello record?

A: Well I don’t currently have a record contract. That doesn’t mean that one couldn’t be found, I just didn’t want one for a number of years. As you know, since the last album that solely credited to me came out, which was six years ago, I’ve been part of two very interesting records that were really not like anything I’ve ever made before. One was the collaboration with the Roots (2013’s Wise Up Ghost), where we went to a very different approach to production, a different approach to rhythm and I was more the lyricist initially, although I had a lot to do obviously with the shaping of the melodies that are there … And then, of course, (in 2014) I was part of the New Basement Tapes, Lost on the River collective, setting these apparently lost Dylan lyrics (to music). I mean what a great thing to get to do, you know? We recorded 42 pieces of music in something like 12 days or something, it was a ridiculous work rate.

So I haven’t been focused on that. I have been creating. The thing I’ve done instead of selfishly recording more songs just because I can is to create these three stage shows in succession, the Spectacular Spinning Songbook, Detour and the Imperial Bedroom and Other Chambers as a framework to play those old and new songs, both well-known and less well-known songs, and put them all in the most favourable light if I could. So, when I come to Calgary I would imagine I will find a way to play you a couple of songs from a musical (A Face In the Crowd) that I’m working on with Sarah Ruhl, which is I would say at the mid point of development towards of an actual run …

A few of them I’ve previewed them in the Detour concerts and even in the Imperial Bedroom shows, we played full band arrangements of a few of them and people’s reactions have been pretty remarkable, I have to say. I don’t want to jinx it by telling you that and then maybe they don’t go over so well in Calgary, but there you go. That’s what it is. They will be among the songs that could be in the show. I try to sort of put them in the company of the songs that people know well. It’s been my experience that when people hear something they know well it opens them up to hearing something they haven’t heard before. If you play 15 songs back to back that nobody has ever heard before, understandably people can get a bit perplexed.

(Note: This interview was edited for space and clarity.)

Elvis Costello performs Dec. 10 at the Jubilee Auditorium in support of the Owen Hart Foundation. For tickets go to ticketmaster.ca.

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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby johnfoyle » Sat Dec 03, 2016 7:35 am

' And in the same way I came to terms with the fact that a lot of the music on Imperial Bedroom had never really been played the way it was written. At the time that that record was released, me and my band were about different things. And now the three of us that were part of making that record have all of the accumulation of what we’ve learned from playing music for 40 years and were able to listen to the songs for what they actually are instead of trying to hammer them literally like you would a piece of metal work into a different shape, actually play them for the values in the songs. That takes a little bit of restraint so the power of the song is actually revealed …'

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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby johnfoyle » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:17 am

http://calgaryherald.com/life/swerve/th ... s-costello


The poseur's guide to Elvis Costello

JOSIAH HUGHES, SWERVE
December 7, 2016

Elvis Costello is a punk poet and a rock ’n’ roll legend. But what about the man behind the music? Stand out from the pack with our poseur’s guide to this pillar of pop culture.

His Name Is True Poseurs are petty people, so let’s get some facts straight. Be sure to drop the factoid that Elvis Costello is not really the performer’s real name. He was born in the London area of Paddington in 1954 under the name Declan Patrick MacManus. He adopted the stage name Elvis Costello in the ’70s (in part as a tribute to his father, who had performed under the name Day Costello). Other pseudonyms include the Imposter, Howard Coward, Mac Manus and Napoleon Dynamite (no, not that Napoleon Dynamite).

Pump It Up Before he was a Grammy-winning musician, Costello was a punk-leaning pop singer in Britain’s burgeoning new wave movement. His first single, “Less Than Zero,” was released in 1977 on the legendary punk imprint Stiff Records—also home of artists like The Damned, Pointed Sticks and Wreckless Eric. Costello’s first five albums were produced by legendary pub rock producer and performer Nick Lowe.


Clowntime Is Over While his early work produced countless hits, including “Alison,” “Pump It Up” and “Watching the Detectives,” a real poseur scoffs at entry-level material. Costello, too, decided to eschew the simple, and has dabbled in everything from country to jazz to classical.

Radio, Radio, Film and TV If you really want to seem like you’ve been watching Costello’s every move, you should verse yourself on his place in pop culture. Lorne Michaels famously banned Costello from Saturday Night Live in 1977 for stopping his label-mandated performances live on air and swapping out a song for the raucous punk anthem “Radio Radio.” He’s since made appearances in a diverse list of film and television projects, including Spice World, 200 Cigarettes, The Larry Sanders Show, The Late Show with David Letterman (where he stepped in for an ill Letterman and hosted an entire episode), The Simpsons, Frasier and even Talledega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby.

Elvis Costello: Saturday, Dec. 10 at Jubilee Auditorium. 8 p.m. $70 – $150. Tickets at Ticketmaster.

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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby bronxapostle » Thu Dec 08, 2016 9:58 am

He should play Greg Lakes I BELIEVE IN FATHER CHRISTMAS!

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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby And No Coffee Table » Sun Dec 11, 2016 1:02 am

http://calgaryherald.com/entertainment/ ... h-artistry

Review: Elvis Costello mixes nostalgia with artistry in Calgary show
By Gerry Krochak
Published on: December 10, 2016 | Last Updated: December 10, 2016 10:33 PM MST

Elvis was in the building.

Call it an early Christmas present for fans, or a wonderful gift in support of the Owen Hart Foundation … either way, it was difficult not to feel the warm glow inside the fabulous Jubilee Auditorium on Saturday night.

From punk to pub rock, everything in between and everything on the outside, Elvis Costello has always gotten away with doing whatever he wants because, well, he’s good at all of it. That, and, despite near-legendary status, he prefers to toil on the periphery. His greatest expectations have always begun and ended with himself — we’ve just been along for the wonderful ride, which has now lasted 40 years … and counting.

Following the eloquent words of Dr. Martha Hart to open this special evening, the now 62-year-old former Declan Patrick McManus, smiled broadly while receiving a long, warm, enthusiastic welcome … merely for walking onto the Jube stage. Now, that’s respect!

While it’s true that we’re all aging at the same clip, it wouldn’t take long to understand that some are just doing it more gracefully and joyfully than others.

On a clean, well-lit stage featuring a giant old-school television, and littered only with a baby grand piano and about a half-dozen guitars, Costello spoke not a word, but went straight to his work, launching into ’77’s (Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes, as well as Poison Moon and While Accidents Will Happen at the front end of a set that would clock in at two hours.

“It seems like just yesterday … “ Costello mused, taking a good, long look around his surroundings. “But it’s been 38 years last I last stood on this stage.”

The wide range of admirers (20 and 30-something hipsters, and, mostly, 40 and 50-something musos who were there when new wave and punk were a thing) hooted and hollered while embracing the past and the present.

In keeping with a career of perpetual musical motion, Costello finds new ways to play old songs — his own, or those of others. His sparse arrangement of Ascension Day gave it an emotion not even felt within the grooves of the 2006 Allan Toussaint collaboration, The River In Reverse (on vinyl, of course), while Everyday I Write The Book from ’83’s Punch The Clock leaped from the PA with the (albeit quieter) intensity of his late ’70s new wave and punk halcyon days.

The unpredictable set list, ebbed and flowed through Church Underground, the piano-fuelled melancholy of Shipbuilding and Deep Dark Truthful Mirror from ’89’s Spike, in each case, and in a Dylan-esque manner, regurgitating old lyrics in new, interesting ways, which he sees fit. True artistry isn’t so easily defined or explained in 2016, and often Costello proves that it doesn’t need to be.

Bespectacled (of course) and resplendent in a black suit and jaunty red hat, his constantly entertaining stories and childlike curiosity of music history is evident through everything from the (thus far) unreleased gems, No Man’s Woman and A Face In The Crowd, to the 1930 Roy Turk-penned jazz number, Walkin’ My Baby Back Home and the electric burst of ’77’s Watching The Detectives.

In a rare bout of true nostalgia, many 40-something fans in attendance remembered why they fell in love with Veronica — a terrific interpretation. Some crushes just never go away.

(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding … on this night, absolutely nothing at all.

The Owen Hart Foundation is a tremendous organization for which all Calgarians can be extremely proud. Its mandate of, “Providing opportunities for hard-working people who have limited resources and unlimited potential,” is the bountiful cake.

Last night’s opportunity of an unforgettable evening with a world-class artist is the best icing Costello fans, and music fans in general, could ever have hoped for.

It was, indeed, a Merry Christmas wish for us all …

Elvis Costello
Jubilee Auditorium
Attendance — 2,200
4 stars (out of five)

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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby And No Coffee Table » Sun Dec 11, 2016 1:06 am

http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/inde ... 10_Calgary

01. (The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes
02. Poison Moon
03. Accidents Will Happen
04. Ascension Day
05. Church Underground
06. Everyday I Write The Book
07. Shipbuilding
08. Deep Dark Truthful Mirror
09. No Man's Woman
10. A Face In The Crowd
11. Walkin' My Baby Back Home
12. Ghost Train
13. Veronica
14. Watching The Detectives
15. Alison - off-mic
16. Jimmie Standing In The Rain
17. Blood & Hot Sauce
18. A Town Called Riddle - on piano
19. (What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding?

when i was cruel
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Re: An Evening With Elvis Costello, Calgary, Dec. 10, 2016

Postby when i was cruel » Sun Dec 11, 2016 12:31 pm

Being part of those 21 year old Hipsters I must say I was completely blown away, my years of scrounging for rarities and bootleg performances never came close to how pure and studio-esque his voice was last night, Ive been waiting to see him in Calgary since I was about 7 so this was a treat for my girlfriend (more so i) and I.
It's not the days when you leave me, but all I fear are the nights.



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