T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Pretty self-explanatory
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Jack of All Parades
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby Jack of All Parades » Fri Dec 05, 2014 12:10 pm

I am with you, Wardo, on your solid assessment. I, too, did not think I would like this record as much as I do. But it is not the EC contributions that cause my affection for the project, despite the beautiful calm of the final tune on the disc- Lost on the River. The vocalizations on his contributions are simply too harsh. You use the word 'spit' wisely. My admiration for Jim James continues and his Nothing to it is plain fun and wonderful along with his other contributions to the record. The real ear openers for me are the Goldsmith contributions- Card Shark and Liberty Street. They assuredly catch the feel and tone of those long ago 1967 sessions in the basement. Duncan and Jimmy also gets repeated play on my player. I am quite happy some of these forgotten lyrics have seen the light. Nothing to it, Card Shark and Liberty Street could easily slip into the original recordings with no disruption to that disc's vibe.
"....there's a merry song that starts in 'I' and ends in 'You', as many famous pop songs do....'

charliestumpy
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby charliestumpy » Sat Dec 06, 2014 4:40 am

Thanks to all you mule-buffalo-anything animate-skinning indian-gunning colonials for sharing DPAM in film showed only in USA EC track vocalising what some of us not in USA might like to hear, although not yet available to pay to see,

Elvis Costello - vocalising 'Diamond ring' from film foolishly first shown not in Ireland or Liverpool or Chelsea ...

P.S. I share all otherwise unprchaseable EC-Dylan suitably - and lorks alive, even amazon USA have now sent me my £54 UK Bob complete basement Bootleg 11 CDs/books ...
'Sometimes via the senses, mostly in the mind (or pocket)'.

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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby docinwestchester » Sat Dec 06, 2014 9:18 am

charliestumpy wrote:Elvis Costello - vocalising 'Diamond ring' from film foolishly first shown not in Ireland or Liverpool or Chelsea ...


Pretty cool sequence here:


jardine
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby jardine » Sat Dec 06, 2014 9:58 am

oh this really is a lovely thing to see happening from the inside, and even just this little bit. I've been finding that ec's contributions simply stuck out at first, but now, the more I hear all these songs and versions, they are increasingly like an eccentric musical uncle at a musical family gathering--funny, fabulous, exaggerated, experienced, encouraging, self-centered, over powering, patient, and full of lessons regarding what is possible (all those chords in that one song video--too much, perhaps, but a great thing to experience that sort of stretching of musical imagination).

jardine
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby jardine » Sat Dec 06, 2014 10:03 am

sorry if this has already been mentioned, but is there any word of plans to release this showtime thing? with second dvd of that performance, plus the animated vids for spanish, nothing to it, etc.?

jardine
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby jardine » Sat Dec 06, 2014 4:12 pm

and finally, someone on the hoffman board spotted this in the lyric sheet in the kansascity vid w. mumford: @ the 2 minute mark

You tell me a thousand things a day
And then sleep somewhere’s else at night
I’m going back to Kansas City
People don't care if you're black or white

You invite me into your living room house
And then you say you gotta pay for what you break
I'm going back to Kansas City
People don't care if you're asleep or awake​

MOJO
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby MOJO » Sun Dec 07, 2014 1:10 pm

There is no correlation with the madness going on in MO right now. Elvis mentioned that these lyrics have to do with Dylan wanting to get back the blues or something like that. EC's comment on this can be found within one of the radio interviews. You can find it somewhere on this board.
Last edited by MOJO on Sun Dec 07, 2014 10:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

cwr
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby cwr » Sun Dec 07, 2014 3:34 pm

I got my vinyl copy of this a couple days ago, and it sounds great!

Even the songs that didn't grab me at first have grown on me.

charliestumpy
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby charliestumpy » Mon Dec 08, 2014 3:03 am

docinwestchester wrote:
charliestumpy wrote:Elvis Costello - vocalising 'Diamond ring' from film foolishly first shown not in Ireland or Liverpool or Chelsea ...


Pretty cool sequence here:



Many thanks for posting link etc to EC lead-vocalising on 'Diamond ring' snippet, from 2014-11 TV film 'Lost Songs - The Basement Tapes Continued'.
'Sometimes via the senses, mostly in the mind (or pocket)'.


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docinwestchester
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby docinwestchester » Sun Dec 14, 2014 1:46 am

For those who still haven't seen it, here's the Showtime documentary:

Part 1
https://vimeo.com/114451484

Part 2
https://vimeo.com/114441899

bronxapostle
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby bronxapostle » Sun Dec 14, 2014 11:25 am

if i know you doc, you have made a cdr of all the "DIFFERENT" takes available here and on live television/radio shows too, yes? ill need one please. maybe one of our resident artists will devise artwork for it too. thanks all. best, ba

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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby docinwestchester » Sun Dec 14, 2014 1:13 pm

bronxapostle wrote:if i know you doc, you have made a cdr of all the "DIFFERENT" takes available here and on live television/radio shows too, yes? ill need one please. maybe one of our resident artists will devise artwork for it too. thanks all. best, ba


Have not, but it's an interesting idea.

I have compiled all the TV/radio appearances, so it's possible.

bronxapostle
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby bronxapostle » Sun Dec 14, 2014 4:25 pm

well, you KNOW me doc...AN IDEA MAN!!! lol i bet it would be a one disc compilation or who would NOT be happy with a 2 disc set???

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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby MOJO » Mon Dec 15, 2014 1:50 am

Thanks for posting the doc., doc! I'm sticking with my favs - Jim James (Down on the Bottom and Nothing to it). Taylor Goldsmith is right behind with Diamond Ring. Kansas City is catchy, but burns out pretty quick in my opinion.

charliestumpy
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby charliestumpy » Wed Dec 17, 2014 11:20 pm

docinwestchester wrote:For those who still haven't seen it, here's the Showtime documentary:

Part 1
https://vimeo.com/114451484

Part 2
https://vimeo.com/114441899


Many thanks for these - fine 'Lost On The River - The New Basement Tapes Continued' film.
'Sometimes via the senses, mostly in the mind (or pocket)'.

jardine
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby jardine » Thu Dec 18, 2014 9:35 am

wanted to add my thanks as well. I must say that I found the faked 1967 footage a bit of a waste of time but the rest! wow. could have watched hours and hours--listening to a melody eke itself out slowly, and shape right before your eyes. and p.s., i am madly in love w. t-bone burnett (more than before). I'm a university prof involved in teacher education, and to see such a teacher, who sets up the atmosphere that makes things possible, then pushes, pulls back, encourages and admires what is happening. wonderful. This also happened between the players, letting others be alone, the joke, the suggestion, letting things fail and fade away...nice.

so here's the deal: I'm already ready and willing to wait for volume two of the cd, and the deluxe super whatever of the video with outtakes and...

thanks again

d.j.

jardine
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby jardine » Thu Dec 18, 2014 10:20 am

oh dear

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/lost-on-the ... d=9493192#

comes with a t shirt! completists beware!

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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby The imposter » Sat Dec 20, 2014 10:32 am

Other songwriters it seems are entering into the spirit of The New Basement Tapes :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcgfcJX5EKY

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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby MOJO » Mon Dec 29, 2014 12:50 am

GlasOnGlas is the home for music by Gary Burton. A former UK radio DJ turned song writer, now living in New York City. The word Glas has it's roots in celtic languages and can mean blue, green or even grey. "I'm always intrigued by words and wordplay," says Gary, "And this seemed like a cool name for a band or solo project. Also, since there is a famed jazz musician with my name (not to mention my actual name is something entirely different) it's nice to have something that covers all." A new GlasOnGlas EP is on the way soon!

I got lost on the river, but I got found
I got lost on the river, but I didn't drown
I got lost on the river, but I didn't go down
I got lost on the river, but I got found

When he says he didn't go down, what does that exactly mean? One wonders.

He would fit very well in the Santa Cruz mountains scene... It sounds like a "dude that don't leave his home" kind of record. At least he is putting his creativity out there. Good for him.

sweetest punch
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby sweetest punch » Mon Dec 29, 2014 2:59 pm

http://www.undertheradarmag.com/reviews ... _the_river

The New Basement Tapes: Lost on the River


The period between 1966 and 1968 saw Bob Dylan write and record some of the best material of his career. Those freewheelin' sessions where he laid down tracks with his pals in The Band became the subject of fans and bootleggers alike who couldn't get enough of these songs that deviated so far from what they were used to hearing. Though a deluxe edition of the sessions known as The Basement Tapes was released, a separate batch of Dylan lyrics were discovered by the bard's publisher and given to producer T. Bone Burnett.

Elvis Costello, Marcus Mumford, Taylor Goldsmith, Jim James, and Rhiannon Giddons were tasked with bringing these lost lyrics from a several generations ago to life. This gave them the rare opportunity to take Dylan's lyrics and use them as the inspiration for their own songs. Thus it shouldn't be too surprising that songs sung by luminaries like Costello and James sound like a band fronted by, well, Costello and James. Yet hearing them work within the lyrical structure of a Dylan song is what makes this project sparkling, melodic, and easily one of the most delightfully unique albums of the year.

It would be easy for The New Basement Tapes to lean on the structure of the template provided by the Music From Big Pink era, akin to knowing the formula that works and stubbornly refusing to deviate from it. Between blissful harmonies—like on the James-driven "Down on the Bottom" and the beautiful simplicity of "Kansas City"—the album is as loose and free as anything that Dylan and The Band recorded during that time. Above all, each track in its own way reflects each member fusing their sound while trying to weave in the original flavor of the songs. Somewhere, Bob Dylan couldn't be more proud.

Author rating: 8/10
Since you put me down, it seems i've been very gloomy. You may laugh but pretty girls look right through me.

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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby sweetest punch » Sat Jan 10, 2015 7:05 am

https://orders.relix.com/articles/detail/tapes

Lost and Found: The Making of The New Basement Tapes


It's not every day that T Bone Burnett receives a phone call like this one. Hell, no one had ever gotten a call like this one.

There’s this box, the caller tells him. On the outside of the box it says “1967.” Inside is a pile of handwritten song lyrics in various stages of completion, about 24 in all. They were penned by Bob Dylan while he was holed up—following his famous, debilitating motorcycle accident a year earlier—at 56 Parnassus Lane in West Saugerties, N.Y. The house was called Big Pink; the musicians sharing it would soon become The Band.

Unlike the now-familiar collection of songs known as The Basement Tapes—which has graduated over the decades from a rumor to a bootleg to an official release and now a brand new, 6-CD, 138-track box set—Dylan had never gotten around to setting these other words to music. For nearly half a century, they sat in this box, undiscovered and undisturbed.

The caller, who identifies himself as a representative of Dylan’s music publishing company, is wondering whether Burnett would be interested in getting some folks together and finishing Dylan’s discarded work—with Dylan’s blessing.

“I didn’t ask many questions,” says Burnett on the eve of the November 11 release of Lost on the River: The New Basement Tapes (Electromagnetic Recordings/Harvest Records), the result of his efforts. “I was sort of stunned at the thought of collaborating with a 26-year-old Bob Dylan.”

For Burnett, one of the most celebrated producers, songwriters and musicians of the modern era, this was an assignment unlike any other. As he has been to generations, Dylan is an artist who Burnett holds in the highest regard—an icon. But he’s also more than that to Burnett, whose career shifted into high gear in 1975 when Dylan invited the relative newcomer along on his freewheeling Rolling Thunder Revue tour. Now a multiple Grammy-winner with dozens of productions and other high-profile projects under his belt, Burnett would take the assignment, and he would not take it lightly.

* * *
First Burnett had to decide on an approach. Attempting to appropriate the sound of Dylan and The Band from 47 years ago would be both disrespectful and dishonest. This was not to be a sequel, nor an attempt to get into Dylan’s 1967 head. “I never thought of that,” Burnett says. “Bob, to me, is a friend who I really love and it was such a generous thing for him to throw these lyrics over and say, ‘Take a crack at these.’”

Upon receiving the box and poring over the lyrics, Burnett began devising a plan, making calls of his own. By the end of 2013, he’d narrowed down the cast to five participants—each a vocalist, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who Burnett felt could work well in a collaborative environment and bring something unique to the project. “The thing I love about the original Basement Tapes,” says Burnett, “is those musicians. Every one of them could have been a bandleader himself, but they were all very collaborative. So my first criterion was to find a group of bandleaders who could be collaborative and who could play multiple instruments because that’s one of the interesting things I heard in The Basement Tapes—even though I couldn’t point to a song. Anybody would pick up anything and just start playing.”

Elvis Costello, the senior member of the team, is a contemporary of Burnett’s—the only other participant old enough to remember the original Basement Tapes from when they were first introduced. The others—Marcus Mumford of England’s Mumford & Sons, Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Taylor Goldsmith of Dawes and Rhiannon Giddens of the Carolina Chocolate Drops—are all considerably younger. A drummer, Jay Bellerose, who has worked with Burnett in the past, rounded out the troupe.

Familiarity with the original Basement Tapes—or even with Dylan’s larger canon—was not a prerequisite for participation. Giddens, for one, confesses readily that she was a Dylan “outsider,” exposed to covers of his more ubiquitous songs by the likes of Peter, Paul and Mary and Joan Baez “through my hippie parents,” but not so much to the man himself. When Burnett recruited her for The New Basement Tapes—the title of which also lends itself to the band’s name for the project—she deliberately avoided researching the Dylan recordings. “I did not listen to all of The Basement Tapes,” Giddens says. “Since I’d listened to his source material, I thought I might have something valuable to contribute as a non-Dylanite. I thought I could bring the folk influence.”

Mumford, who is just 27, came to the Big Pink recordings only after being “forcefed” such classic Dylan albums as Blonde On Blonde, Highway 61 Revisited and Blood on the Tracks in his teens by his brother—even then, it was his obsession with The Band, Levon Helm in particular, that drew him to the ‘67 music.

Goldsmith, too, found The Basement Tapes after previous flirtations with other Dylan/Band songs. Once he discovered them, “It was the coolest thing I could imagine,” he says. “At first, I was peripherally aware of it, but I definitely wasn’t familiar with the music. Once I did get a hold of it, it was all I could listen to for a long time. I’d never heard anything else from that time that sounded like that. It was bold and raw—and that lo-fi thing became associated with a statement of some kind. Also, the songs were great; they were coming from a place you don’t hear those artists come from through most of their careers. Bob Dylan was so playful in his lyric writing in that period.”

Jim James, who performed with Dylan on the AmericanaramA tour in 2013, first heard the Dylan/Band recordings “many moons ago,” and they impacted him in a big way. The recordings, he says, are “a beautiful illustration of our favorite artists being human, letting the imperfections sing and even add to the beauty—things that would normally be hidden from view are brought to light and enjoyed because of their flaws.”

Costello, now 60, sought out the Dylan/Band recordings as a teen. “I first encountered The Basement Tapes’ songs in sheet music form in 1969,” he says. “It was a small songbook called A Folio of Bob Dylan Songs. I bought it because I’d heard ‘This Wheel’s on Fire’ [recorded by both The Band and The Byrds] and ‘The Mighty Quinn’ [a hit for Manfred Mann] on the radio and wanted to learn how to play them. I couldn’t read music at that time, so I had to imagine what they might sound like until I picked up ‘You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere’ and ‘Nothing Was Delivered’ by The Byrds. The first time I heard any of The Basement Tapes was when the official double album came out in the ‘70s. I realized that I’d originally heard three of the songs on Music from Big Pink, and that was a record unlike any I’d ever known, so to glimpse how these mysterious songs came into existence made them go down even deeper.”

Regardless of their levels of exposure to the original recordings, each of the musicians was eager to be a part of what could potentially be a historical collaboration, not only with one another but also—although he was physically in absentia—with Bob Dylan. “There were no song titles or anything, just the writing,” says Burnett. “So we were just dealing with the words that were there. I approached it as any composer who’s putting music to a poet’s work. You’re looking for the meaning and the feeling of the thing and you try to find the melody in the words. All words, when you put them together, have melodies. Each sentence has inflections. Melody is just codified inflection. You’re looking for that, you’re looking for the cadences—as you do when you read poetry—and then, you translate that into the rhythms of the song. It’s something I’ve been doing my whole life now, so it’s second nature.”

Rather than split the lyrics into five groups and assign each songwriter specific lyrics to transform, Burnett sent the entire batch to everyone. He deliberately gave them few instructions. Some got to work crafting whole, finished songs from the raw lyrics. Others came up with sketches—ideas to be batted around in the studio and fleshed out by the group. “We all kind of did a different thing, actually,” says Goldsmith. “Marcus was under the impression that we were mainly gonna do collaborating and that was it. I also didn’t know what to expect, so to make sure that I was prepared, I wrote a bunch of songs and I guess Elvis and Jim did, too. When we got there, the three of us had a bunch of versions already, and Marcus and Rhiannon had a couple of ideas. But they, incredibly, wrote a lot of their stuff in the studio. They’d go out and write something and it would be one of the highlights of the record.”

“It was crucial to have both approaches,” says Giddens, “because if we’d been cowriting every song, we would have only gotten just a few recorded. But we had the ones that were ready to go and we could work on those, and then we had the ones that needed work. I chose the ones that spoke to me, that I felt I could tell a story with. I think everybody did that to some degree. I went with some of the obvious ones for me and then kind of found where they might fit and how to approach them. Inspiration struck when it struck.”

James found that some of the lyrics staring him in the face lent themselves perfectly to musical ideas he’d already been developing on his own. “I started turning to ideas or riffs that I had and loved that had no lyrics to them and then, all of a sudden, one lyric would gravitate toward one riff,” he says. “They would start forming this new bond and come together. It was a very special feeling and made me feel happy and filled with joy and tears.”

Costello remembers one song coming to him in his sleep. “I got up and hummed a melody into a recorder and tried to go back to sleep. The next song started to play in my head. This went on for a couple of hours. By morning, I had sketches for five songs and worked on them until they were completed. We ended up recording three of the songs that I began that night. The liberty we were given to set, adapt and even add to the lyrics, in order to complete the sense or emotion that we perceived, was completely unprecedented,” he adds. “When Robert Hunter and I wrote a couple of songs together a few years ago, we corresponded extensively just to agree on one or two specific choices of words in a lyric. In this case, we had no such dialogue. These songs came out of an unopened box-file from 1967. They were sometimes quirky streams of words that had tailed off with a little cartoon in the margins. Some were in blues or Elizabethan-ballad form. Others were very precise texts that immediately called your musical senses to attention.”

One thing that none of the artists considered during the entire process was what Dylan would have done with these same words—or whether he would approve of what they were doing. “This didn’t seem to want to be an exercise in mind reading or time travel,” says Costello. “I tried not to presume about matters that were not on the page. We were given the author’s permission. We didn’t steal these words. We were given this liberty, so it had to be done with panache, not in a precious or intimidated manner. Nothing good comes from fear.”

“Everybody came to this with a healthy respect for Dylan,” adds Giddens, “but also knowing that he had handed over these lyrics. It was important that people felt like they had this leeway.”

* * *
Logistically, just as the songcraft process for the new release was entirely different from Dylan’s approach back at Big Pink, the recording sessions for Lost on the River: The New Basement Tapes bore little resemblance to the setup enjoyed by Dylan and The Band. These sessions did not take place casually in the basement of a rural home, where a group of rocking roommates spent most of their time together, but rather at Hollywood’s Capitol Studios, where different artists with very busy schedules came together with a specific purpose in mind. Burnett was able to block out a two week chunk of studio time when all were available, although both Giddens and Costello missed a couple of sessions due to previous commitments. Then, he loaded the room with instruments and allowed the musicians to work things out among themselves.

A look at the credits offers a glimpse into the looseness. Some songs find a lone collaborator interpreting Dylan’s lyrics and singing his or her song with the others offering instrumental and/or vocal support. On other tunes, a couple of the contributors pair off and vocalists trade off. Giddens handled all of the banjo and fiddle parts, while the others took the kid-in-a-candystore approach, availing themselves of anything that made a sound: Mumford played not only acoustic and electric guitars and mandolin but also drums. James, Costello and Goldsmith took turns on bass and Mellotron. Burnett added some electric guitar and, while Costello was off in Vegas playing a gig with The Roots at Brooklyn Bowl, a certain Johnny Depp came by and added some guitar licks in his place.

“We had, I think, 16 tunes going into it and when the box showed up at the studio, we found eight more songs,” says Burnett. “We just sort of felt our way through it. If somebody was inspired and wanted to take it and felt like doing one, we did it. It was all generosity. Somebody would come up with a song and somebody else would say, ‘I’ll play bass.’ Somebody else would say, ‘I’ll play drums. I’ll play guitar. Do you want any vocals?’ I just made room for good things to run wild.”

Goldsmith confirms that Burnett’s role as producer was not so much to call the specific musical shots but instead to foster creativity and teamwork. “T Bone would be in the control room and he would check in with us after takes,” he says. “I’d never worked with him before and he is so good at keeping spirits high and keeping people motivated. There were moments when I thought, ‘I sound bad’ or ‘We sound bad,’ and he would come in and talk about why something was working. Even if, in the bigger picture, it wasn’t working yet, he would focus on what was working. That would lift everybody’s mood and make us recommit to wanting to do a good job. He wouldn’t let us get down on ourselves, which is easy for any artist to do. He really hears a lot of subtleties and was definitely working with us in a musical way as well. We were working at such a breakneck speed. We recorded something like 40 songs [including the multiple versions by the various collaborators] in two weeks and we’d never played together. T Bone would get involved when it was fundamental stuff like a tempo, a vocal delivery or a mood but when it came to a missed chord, or maybe someone was overplaying a bit, he would let it go and they would address it in mixing or whatever. Because of the nature of the project, we had to keep moving at all times—we’d record so many songs in a day, it was insane.”

“It was actually very freeing,” says Giddens about the laxity. “And I have to give credit to T Bone and his engineers. Just the mic’ing—we’d go to another tune and he’d have to mic everybody. We’re all in one room full of basses and electric guitars. It was pretty amazing. There were a couple of songs that I remember sounded really cool and rough and he’d say, ‘Great, but let’s do something else.’ We weren’t going after a smooth, clean sound, but there were some songs that deserved that approach. They deserved to be looked at again and sort of chased a little bit. There was a cool dichotomy going on.”

“It was rough and dirty and quick,” says James. “Like, ‘Hey, you got a song? OK, the chords are G-C-D. Let’s do it!’ Bang, bang, bang! Next song! That was fun and liberating and challenging for everyone.”

None of this would matter, of course, if the music was anything less than brilliant. It all makes for a good story: how these contemporary artists came together to complete what Bob Dylan had abandoned decades ago. But ultimately, Lost on the River: The New Basement Tapes succeeds or fails on its own accord. Fortunately, it’s as inspiring as it is inspired. From “Down on the Bottom,” the opening track, to “Lost on the River #20,” which ends it all, the 15 recordings that comprise the final album (20 on the deluxe) add up to a particularly rewarding listen—some of the finest, most original Americana of 2014.

Dylan’s voice, though not heard, is present nonetheless in the humor, the romanticism, the adventure, the pain and the weirdness of his lyrics—the music sounds nothing like the ‘60s Basement Tapes but there’s only one person who could have written songs like “Married to My Hack,” “Card Shark,” “Duncan And Jimmy” and “Six Months in Kansas City (Liberty Street).” The performances—stunning lead vocals from Giddens and Costello, smartly framed inventive licks from the instrumentalists, and the whole vibe of it—are testaments not only to the source material but also to the collective creativity at work. Considering that the recordings were made while a full crew filmed the proceedings for a forthcoming documentary, the intimacy projected is all the more remarkable.

“I really relished singing ‘When I Get My Hands on You,’” says Mumford about one of his tunes, “because I didn’t have to have my hands on a guitar; I enjoyed just singing. I’ve never really sung a pure love song as well. It’s interesting, looking at that box of lyrics that he gave us. If he didn’t release those lyrics, it’s just unbelievable. His tossed cuts are better than anyone else’s prime cuts!”

Of another track, “Golden Tom – Silver Judas,” Goldsmith says, “I think we spent all of 15 or 20 minutes on that one. Elvis showed us, ‘This is how it goes,’ and we all picked up an instrument and learned the harmonies and moved on. I never had a chance to really think about it, but then, when I listened back to it once we got a hold of the masters, I was truly moved by how beautiful that one was. And when we were recording Rhiannon’s ‘Lost on the River,’ that, too, was a beautiful, moving moment.”

* * *

So why did Bob Dylan record these songs if they’re so good? He hasn’t said, and his friend T Bone Burnett didn’t ask. “Some of these lyrics were some of Dylan’s most personal writing at the time,” Burnett says, “but I’m not surprised that he left them behind because it’s not his way to wear everything on his sleeve or put everything out there in some kind of obvious way or even some kind of clear way.”

Costello, who also knows and has worked with Dylan, offers another view: “Maybe if it had been raining one day in 1967, those guys would have gone back into the basement quicker and one of these lyrics would have ended up on those reels, but we might not have had, say, ‘Tears Of Rage.’”

History has dictated when each batch of songs first saw the light of day; each of the musicians has called these words, and the chance to make songs of them, a gift. “What a golden opportunity this was,” says Giddens. “You hear a lot of terrible things about egos in the music industry, but everybody put that aside for this project. Everybody laid their heart out on the table for four other artists and we took care of each other. T Bone knew how to shepherd and when to stop and when to go. It’s an amazing thing.”

“I’ve had a lot of dreams that have come true and I’ve had a lot of dreams that have not,” says Goldsmith about being called on. “But that was one that I never even thought of having.”
Since you put me down, it seems i've been very gloomy. You may laugh but pretty girls look right through me.

The Gentleman
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby The Gentleman » Sat Jan 10, 2015 4:18 pm

Was it news to everyone else that EC had written a couple songs with Robert Hunter?

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And No Coffee Table
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby And No Coffee Table » Sat Jan 10, 2015 4:25 pm

The Gentleman wrote:Was it news to everyone else that EC had written a couple songs with Robert Hunter?


EC played a Robert Hunter co-write called "Tomorrow's Blues" at the Richard de Lone benefit in 2012, but this may be the first mention of a second song.

http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Concert_2012-10-06_San_Francisco_(early)
http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Concert_2012-10-06_San_Francisco_(late)
http://www.elviscostellofans.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9588

I've not yet heard a recording of either 2012 show, but I know one exists.

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bambooneedle
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Re: T-Bone / Dylan project: Lost On The River

Postby bambooneedle » Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:11 pm

Had a listen to some of these songs on youtube and so on but I can't get over the main obstacle to my appreciation of this endeavour from the beginning - not knowing who wrote what.


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