Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Pretty self-explanatory
johnfoyle
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby johnfoyle » Tue Jan 21, 2020 4:36 pm

Image

Elvis Costello NME, 15 December 1984. #NME #MyLifeInTheUKMusicPress #1984 https://t.co/3hxZqEWnQB

http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/inde ... Pm2aaUy6t8

Nick White answered my email asking about this -

That was a very hard gig to photograph as no photographers were allowed up the front. Obviously it was back in the pre-digital days and I haven’t scanned any of them. I also photographed Mr Costello for the cover of an album (Terror And Magnificence, 1996) by the saxophonist, John Harle. Again these were shot on film.

https://www.nickwhite.uk/about


Image

johnfoyle
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby johnfoyle » Wed Jan 22, 2020 2:19 am

Nick adds -

The portrait photograph for Terror and Magnificence - the John Harle album with EC was shot somewhere in Camden if I remember correctly and EC was kind of brought there under somewhat dubious false pretences as John Harle swept by with him after they had been for lunch - EC thought he was going back to the recording studio. It made for a less than comfortable (and brief) sitting. Harle is a good saxophonist though. Many years since I have listened to the album but I remember liking it at the time. Oh, and Graham Lock who wrote the review now lives in Nottingham and remains a close friend. He generally specialised in jazz back then before dedicating himself to classical music.

sulky lad
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby sulky lad » Wed Jan 22, 2020 6:31 am

Terror And Magnificence remains my favourite EC diversion by some distance, and the album is magnificent (though not terrifying) especially Sarah Leonard's contributions. Saw it live twice in 1996, in Nottingham and Birmingham.
Last edited by sulky lad on Thu Jan 23, 2020 12:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

JONPD
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby JONPD » Wed Jan 22, 2020 4:11 pm

sulky lad wrote:Terror And Magnificence remains my favourite EC diversion by some distance, and the album is magnificent (though not terrifying) especially Sarah Leonard's contributions. Saw it live twice in 1966, in Nottingham and Birmingham.



1966? :)

sulky lad
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby sulky lad » Thu Jan 23, 2020 12:33 am

JONPD wrote:
sulky lad wrote:Terror And Magnificence remains my favourite EC diversion by some distance, and the album is magnificent (though not terrifying) especially Sarah Leonard's contributions. Saw it live twice in 1966, in Nottingham and Birmingham.



1966? :)


Sorry dyslexic typing fingers - duly amended !

I know I had an awful head cold for the Symphony Hall concert and sat in the Gods stinking of menthol cough sweets ! :shock:

sweetest punch
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby sweetest punch » Wed Feb 05, 2020 1:11 pm

https://theguideliverpool.com/27-liverp ... y-forever/

27 Liverpool bands and musicians that have shaped our city forever

We could go on forever with a list of Liverpool bands and musicians who have shaped our city, let’s start with these 27.

Liverpool is home to the biggest band in the world – we’ll leave that one to your imagination, but we’ve never been short of chart-topping, dance-floor filling talent in any decade, and the music doesn’t stop playing at the end of this list as our music scene continues to flourish into new decade too.

Here are 26 (of many) Liverpool bands and musicians that have shaped a city that has music etched in its heart.

(...)
3 – Elvis Costello

Christened Declan Patrick MacManus at Holy Cross Church, Birkenhead, after living in London with frequent holidays to visit family in Liverpool, Elvis Costello moved back to his parents’ native Liverpool in 1971, studying at St Francis Xavier’s college, forming his first band and playing his first gigs around the city.

Elvis Costello and The Attractions scored their breakout hit in 1977 with Watching the Detectives and in December that year, made US headlines after a controversial appearance on Saturday Night Live when Elvis defied producers and played Radio, Radio – an anti-commercial media track which captivated just the right audience who became his loyal US fanbase.

Based in New York and inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2003, the LFC fan and critically-acclaimed musician and singer still considers Liverpool his home, scoring his biggest US single in 1989 with Top 20 hit Veronica co-written by Paul McCartney, while his biggest UK hit Oliver’s Army reached Nº2 in 1979 and featured Hoylake Road’s Clockwork Orange Café on the sleeve.
(...)
Since you put me down, it seems i've been very gloomy. You may laugh but pretty girls look right through me.

sheeptotheslaughter
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby sheeptotheslaughter » Fri Feb 07, 2020 3:27 am

sweetest punch wrote:https://theguideliverpool.com/27-liverpool-bands-and-musicians-that-have-shaped-our-city-forever/

27 Liverpool bands and musicians that have shaped our city forever

We could go on forever with a list of Liverpool bands and musicians who have shaped our city, let’s start with these 27.

Liverpool is home to the biggest band in the world – we’ll leave that one to your imagination, but we’ve never been short of chart-topping, dance-floor filling talent in any decade, and the music doesn’t stop playing at the end of this list as our music scene continues to flourish into new decade too.

Here are 26 (of many) Liverpool bands and musicians that have shaped a city that has music etched in its heart.

(...)
3 – Elvis Costello

Christened Declan Patrick MacManus at Holy Cross Church, Birkenhead, after living in London with frequent holidays to visit family in Liverpool, Elvis Costello moved back to his parents’ native Liverpool in 1971, studying at St Francis Xavier’s college, forming his first band and playing his first gigs around the city.

Elvis Costello and The Attractions scored their breakout hit in 1977 with Watching the Detectives and in December that year, made US headlines after a controversial appearance on Saturday Night Live when Elvis defied producers and played Radio, Radio – an anti-commercial media track which captivated just the right audience who became his loyal US fanbase.

Based in New York and inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2003, the LFC fan and critically-acclaimed musician and singer still considers Liverpool his home, scoring his biggest US single in 1989 with Top 20 hit Veronica co-written by Paul McCartney, while his biggest UK hit Oliver’s Army reached Nº2 in 1979 and featured Hoylake Road’s Clockwork Orange Café on the sleeve.
(...)

Is there a Paddington in Liverpool too? He's a Londoner :D :D

sulky lad
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby sulky lad » Fri Feb 07, 2020 8:55 am

Watch out, John Foyle will be claiming he's Irish as well next !!
Sadly he'll never be able to claim he's a Plymbob ( as my wife insists on calling people born in Plymouth !) :roll:

sweetest punch
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby sweetest punch » Wed Feb 12, 2020 12:37 pm

https://www.thethings.com/15-interestin ... thew-koma/

15 Interesting Facts About Hilary Duff's Husband, Matthew Koma
If you are not aware of Matthew through music, you might have heard about him due to his recent marriage to former Disney darling, Hilary Duff.

(...)
9. All Thanks To Costello

With Matthew being a DJ and music producer, you would think that his main influence would be someone like Paul van Dyk. That could not be further from the truth, as he had rock influences in his life. His inspirations for making music include Elvis Costello, Bruce Springsteen, and Stephan Jenkins.
(...)
Since you put me down, it seems i've been very gloomy. You may laugh but pretty girls look right through me.

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Man out of Time
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Re: Relatively Insignificant EC Stuff. . .

Postby Man out of Time » Fri Feb 14, 2020 8:19 am

A letter from the novelist, critic and journalist Philip Hensher in the London Review of Books, Vol 42, Number 4 quotes a couple of lines from Tramp The Dirt Down:

"Labour’s Defeat

In the course of his excellent piece about the December election (LRB, 6 February), James Butler says that Jeremy Corbyn possessed the quality of resilience: ‘He withstood a level of opprobrium almost unprecedented in public life.’ One wonders whether ‘resilience’ is quite the word, when complaints about the supposedly unprecedented opprobrium have been noisy and outraged. Butler echoes the claim in the Labour Party’s post-election report that ‘there is also little doubt that four years of unrelenting attacks on the character of the party leader, an assault without precedent in modern politics, had a degree of negative impact.’

Perhaps they ought to read Charles Moore’s biography of Margaret Thatcher. He records some of the statements by public figures, in public or in writing, about her character, appearance and personal attributes. Dennis Potter called her ‘repellent’. David Hare said that her influence would disappear after she went, ‘leaving nothing but the memory of a funny accent’. Alan Bennett said that she was ‘a kind of maiden aunt who knows all about marriage’. Mary Warnock said that a film of her in Marks and Spencer had ‘something really quite obscene about it’. Jonathan Miller called her ‘loathsome, repulsive in almost every way’. Songs were released by pop bands with lines like ‘I want to change into a dog so that I can use Madame Thatcher daily as a lamp-post,’ or ‘When they finally put you in the ground/They’ll stand there laughing and tramp the dirt down,’ or, concisely, ‘Maggie, Maggie, you cunt/Maggie, Maggie, Maggie, Maggie, you fucking cunt’. Alice Thomas Ellis called her ‘a mean little mouse bred on cheese rind and broken biscuit and the nutritionless, platitudinous parings of a grocer’s mind’. Much later, admired novelists would write stories fantasising about her violent murder set around the time of her attempted assassination in Brighton, a time when (as everyone concedes) she behaved with notable bravery.

This is not to complain about this sorry and often childish catalogue of insults, which some readers will think richly deserved, while others will hold that opprobrium is only to be expected by a politician proposing radical change, whether Thatcher or Corbyn. But it isn’t correct to suggest that the opprobrium Corbyn undoubtedly experienced and clearly thought unjust was unprecedented. If there was a popular West End musical with a song looking forward to celebrating Corbyn’s death, as Billy Elliot gleefully anticipated and, in the event, celebrated Thatcher’s, I missed it.

Philip Hensher
London SW8"

As Elvis has pointed out, whoever nominated him for an OBE may have overlooked this song, just as they overlooked Billy Elliot the Musical when nominating Sir Elton John to become a Companion of Honour in the 2020 New Year's Honours.

MOOT


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